2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/253892
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Text Messaging: An Innovative Educational Method
Author(s):
Goomis, Sara E.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Pi-at-Large
Author Details:
Sara E. Goomis, EdD, MSN, RN, sgoomis@unmc.edu
Abstract:

Poster presented on Thursday, September 20, 2012, Friday, September 21, 2012

Parenting adolescents often have high risks post-pregnancy both for themselves and their children, which create educational needs; therefore methods of healthcare education must change to better meet these needs.  Home visitation, seen as the traditional means for education with this population, has proven effective in some cases, but continues to have limitations.  These limitations are plentiful and may include monetary confinements from the delivering agency, a lack of transportation from the client and/or a need for many parenting adolescents to continue with work and/or school; all of these creating barriers for a home visit to occur. Adolescent mothers whom are often recipients of this visitation, continue to need health promotion education.  Health promotion education and continued communication may relate to the well-being of both mother and child. 

Due to the increase in limitations with home visiting, the use of text messaging (texting) with cell phone technology may be utilized to enhance the education of new mothers.

The use of weekly text blasts with post-partum adolescents in this study allowed for more frequent periods of contact, enabling communication in variable settings over a period of six months.  This in turn resulted in improved outcomes for the mothers and their children related to the areas studied including the prolonged use of breast milk, compliance with the recommended childhood immunization schedule and compliance with follow-up care. 

Perceptions were identified from the post-partum adolescent mothers.  They reported the text messaging as a “communication preference” and identified this method as an easy way to “obtain needed education.” The adolescents also reported a wish for “continued service” and identified this as “a means of support” that otherwise wouldn’t exist.  These results indicate utilizing text messaging may be beneficial.  This method could fill a current void and allow for greater overall outcomes for mother and child.

Keywords:
Health promotion/education; Text messaging; Adolescent mothers
Repository Posting Date:
29-Nov-2012
Date of Publication:
29-Nov-2012
Conference Date:
2012
Conference Name:
Leadership Forum 2012
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Leadership Forum 2012 Theme: Nursing Leadership: Impact at Every Level. Held at the Hyatt Regency Indianapolis

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleText Messaging: An Innovative Educational Methoden_GB
dc.contributor.authorGoomis, Sara E.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Pi-at-Largeen_GB
dc.author.detailsSara E. Goomis, EdD, MSN, RN, sgoomis@unmc.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/253892-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on Thursday, September 20, 2012, Friday, September 21, 2012</p> Parenting adolescents often have high risks post-pregnancy both for themselves and their children, which create educational needs; therefore methods of healthcare education must change to better meet these needs.&nbsp; Home visitation, seen as the traditional means for education with this population, has proven effective in some cases, but continues to have limitations.&nbsp; These limitations are plentiful and may include monetary confinements from the delivering agency, a lack of transportation from the client and/or a need for many parenting adolescents to continue with work and/or school; all of these creating barriers for a home visit to occur. Adolescent mothers whom are often recipients of this visitation, continue to need health promotion <a name="_GoBack"></a>education.&nbsp; Health promotion education and continued communication may relate to the well-being of both mother and child.&nbsp; <p class="Normal">Due to the increase in limitations with home visiting, the use of text messaging (texting) with cell phone technology may be utilized to enhance the education of new mothers. <p class="Normal">The use of weekly text blasts with post-partum adolescents in this study allowed for more frequent periods of contact, enabling communication in variable settings over a period of six months.&nbsp; This in turn resulted in improved outcomes for the mothers and their children related to the areas studied including the prolonged use of breast milk, compliance with the recommended childhood immunization schedule and compliance with follow-up care.&nbsp; <p class="Normal">Perceptions were identified from the post-partum adolescent mothers.&nbsp; They reported the text messaging as a &ldquo;communication preference&rdquo; and identified this method as an easy way to &ldquo;obtain needed education.&rdquo; The adolescents also reported a wish for &ldquo;continued service&rdquo; and identified this as &ldquo;a means of support&rdquo; that otherwise wouldn&rsquo;t exist.&nbsp; These results indicate utilizing text messaging may be beneficial.&nbsp; This method could fill a current void and allow for greater overall outcomes for mother and child.en_GB
dc.subjectHealth promotion/educationen_GB
dc.subjectText messagingen_GB
dc.subjectAdolescent mothersen_GB
dc.date.available2012-11-29T13:39:21Z-
dc.date.issued2012-11-29-
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-29T13:39:21Z-
dc.conference.date2012en_GB
dc.conference.nameLeadership Forum 2012en_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionLeadership Forum 2012 Theme: Nursing Leadership: Impact at Every Level. Held at the Hyatt Regency Indianapolisen_GB
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