Cultivating Leadership Skills in Beginning Undergraduate Student Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/253893
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cultivating Leadership Skills in Beginning Undergraduate Student Nurses
Author(s):
Emeghebo, Lorraine
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Epsilon Kappa
Author Details:
Lorraine Emeghebo, EdD, MS, BSN, BS, RN, lemeghebo@molloy.edu
Abstract:

Poster presented on Friday, September 21, 2012, Thursday, September 20, 2012

Nursing students are expected to learn leadership and management skills so that by the time they graduate, they have the confidence to delegate assignments to assistive personnel, at the very least. Because students practice their skills under the watchful eyes of their clinical instructor who is the link between the student and staff, student nurses seldom have the opportunity or autonomy to form a collaborative relationship with nursing staff. When students can communicate effectively with staff on the unit, they are able to practice delegation in a manner that influences a positive response to a request, which in turn increases their level of self confidence. This project facilitates leadership experiences that allow students to use critical thinking and decision-making skills to structure their day, and complete their clinical assignment by delegating to assistive nursing personnel.

During the second half of their Medical-Surgical I clinical rotation, when students are sufficiently socialized to the culture of the unit, they are assigned two patients. Students prepare a realistic time-line for the day and come to clinical prepared to discuss medications and patient care. Students decide the appropriate time they will administer their medications with instructor guidance. This frees students to administer and monitor other therapeutic interventions without waiting around for the instructor to supervise them with medication administration, and allows the instructor to spend quality time with each student. Based on each patient’s needs, students must decide what aspect of care they can accomplish and what they can safely delegate. They learn to collaborate and negotiate on a professional level as hand-holding is gradually withdrawn.

At post conference, students reflect on their experience and are given feedback. Students are taught to think on their feet, while instructor support is still nearby. This method provides beginning students with the opportunity to assume leadership roles.

Keywords:
delegation; management; leadership
Repository Posting Date:
29-Nov-2012
Date of Publication:
29-Nov-2012
Conference Date:
2012
Conference Name:
Leadership Forum 2012
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Leadership Forum 2012 Theme: Nursing Leadership: Impact at Every Level. Held at the Hyatt Regency Indianapolis

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCultivating Leadership Skills in Beginning Undergraduate Student Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEmeghebo, Lorraineen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentEpsilon Kappaen_GB
dc.author.detailsLorraine Emeghebo, EdD, MS, BSN, BS, RN, lemeghebo@molloy.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/253893-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on Friday, September 21, 2012, Thursday, September 20, 2012</p> Nursing students are expected to learn leadership and management skills so that by the time they graduate, they have the confidence to delegate assignments to assistive personnel, at the very least. Because students practice their skills under the watchful eyes of their clinical instructor who is the link between the student and staff, student nurses seldom have the opportunity or autonomy to form a collaborative relationship with nursing staff. When students can communicate effectively with staff on the unit, they are able to practice delegation in a manner that influences a positive response to a request, which in turn increases their level of self confidence. This project facilitates leadership experiences that allow students to use critical thinking and decision-making skills to structure their day, and complete their clinical assignment by delegating to assistive nursing personnel. <p>During the second half of their Medical-Surgical I clinical rotation, when students are sufficiently socialized to the culture of the unit, they are assigned two patients. Students prepare a realistic time-line for the day and come to clinical prepared to discuss medications and patient care. Students decide the appropriate time they will administer their medications with instructor guidance. This frees students to administer and monitor other therapeutic interventions without waiting around for the instructor to supervise them with medication administration, and allows the instructor to spend quality time with each student. Based on each patient&rsquo;s needs, students must decide what aspect of care they can accomplish and what they can safely delegate. They learn to collaborate and negotiate on a professional level as hand-holding is gradually withdrawn. <p>At post conference, students reflect on their experience and are given feedback. Students are taught to think on their feet, while instructor support is still nearby. This method provides beginning students with the opportunity to assume leadership roles.en_GB
dc.subjectdelegationen_GB
dc.subjectmanagementen_GB
dc.subjectleadershipen_GB
dc.date.available2012-11-29T13:39:22Z-
dc.date.issued2012-11-29-
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-29T13:39:22Z-
dc.conference.date2012en_GB
dc.conference.nameLeadership Forum 2012en_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionLeadership Forum 2012 Theme: Nursing Leadership: Impact at Every Level. Held at the Hyatt Regency Indianapolisen_GB
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