Decision Making: Staff Nurse and Nurse Manager Actual and Preferred Decisional Involvement

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/253914
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Decision Making: Staff Nurse and Nurse Manager Actual and Preferred Decisional Involvement
Author(s):
Barnett, Karen
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Mu Beta
Author Details:
Karen Barnett, DNP, RN, barnettk3@southernct.edu
Abstract:

Poster presented on Thursday, September 20, 2012, Friday, September 21, 2012

Abstract: Decision Making: Staff Nurse and Nurse Manager Actual and Preferred Decisional Involvement Karen L. Barnett, RN, DNP Abstract: A number of factors have been identified as enhancing recruitment and retention of staff nurses. One current model is that of shared governance which has been shown in the literature to integrate core nursing values and beliefs that professional practice embraces as a means to achieve quality care. Practices such as autonomy, empowerment, involvement and participation in decision making are advocated in the shared governance model. We assume that nurses want to participate in decision making, but this assumption has not been validated in the through research. Additionally, only one study was found that compared staff nurses and nurse manager perceptions of who was involved in decision making and who they thought should be involved. Therefore, additional evidence is needed to support implementation of practice changes. The purpose of this study was to explore staff nurse ratings of actual and preferred decisional involvement and to determine differences in actual and preferred ratings between staff nurses and nurse managers/administrators overall and on the Decisional Involvment Scale subscales. The descriptive, correlation study took place at a community acute care hospital on the East Coast of the United States. Data from a sample including 86 registered nurses and 9 nurse administrators from one hospital were analyzed for differences in actual and preferred ratings on the Decisional Involvement Scale subscales. t-tests between the group mean scores revealed statistically significant differences. Demographic variables were analyzed to determine if any variables were associated with decision making preference. As suggested by the small sample size and the use of one facility, further studies on this topic are needed. The data will be used to identify practices that will enhance decision making and that are reflective of shared governance.
Keywords:
Leadership; Shared Governance; Enhanced Practice
Repository Posting Date:
29-Nov-2012
Date of Publication:
29-Nov-2012
Conference Date:
2012
Conference Name:
Leadership Forum 2012
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Leadership Forum 2012 Theme: Nursing Leadership: Impact at Every Level. Held at the Hyatt Regency Indianapolis

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDecision Making: Staff Nurse and Nurse Manager Actual and Preferred Decisional Involvementen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarnett, Karenen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentMu Betaen_GB
dc.author.detailsKaren Barnett, DNP, RN, barnettk3@southernct.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/253914-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on Thursday, September 20, 2012, Friday, September 21, 2012</p> Abstract: Decision Making: Staff Nurse and Nurse Manager Actual and Preferred Decisional Involvement Karen L. Barnett, RN, DNP Abstract: A number of factors have been identified as enhancing recruitment and retention of staff nurses. One current model is that of shared governance which has been shown in the literature to integrate core nursing values and beliefs that professional practice embraces as a means to achieve quality care. Practices such as autonomy, empowerment, involvement and participation in decision making are advocated in the shared governance model. We assume that nurses want to participate in decision making, but this assumption has not been validated in the through research. Additionally, only one study was found that compared staff nurses and nurse manager perceptions of who was involved in decision making and who they thought should be involved. Therefore, additional evidence is needed to support implementation of practice changes. The purpose of this study was to explore staff nurse ratings of actual and preferred decisional involvement and to determine differences in actual and preferred ratings between staff nurses and nurse managers/administrators overall and on the Decisional Involvment Scale subscales. The descriptive, correlation study took place at a community acute care hospital on the East Coast of the United States. Data from a sample including 86 registered nurses and 9 nurse administrators from one hospital were analyzed for differences in actual and preferred ratings on the Decisional Involvement Scale subscales. t-tests between the group mean scores revealed statistically significant differences. Demographic variables were analyzed to determine if any variables were associated with decision making preference. As suggested by the small sample size and the use of one facility, further studies on this topic are needed. The data will be used to identify practices that will enhance decision making and that are reflective of shared governance.en_GB
dc.subjectLeadershipen_GB
dc.subjectShared Governanceen_GB
dc.subjectEnhanced Practiceen_GB
dc.date.available2012-11-29T13:39:36Z-
dc.date.issued2012-11-29-
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-29T13:39:36Z-
dc.conference.date2012en_GB
dc.conference.nameLeadership Forum 2012en_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionLeadership Forum 2012 Theme: Nursing Leadership: Impact at Every Level. Held at the Hyatt Regency Indianapolisen_GB
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