The factors influencing, and the nature of their impact, on the child and family health nurse's ability to work in partnership with parents

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/262576
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The factors influencing, and the nature of their impact, on the child and family health nurse's ability to work in partnership with parents
Author(s):
Dowse, Eileen; Keatinge, Diana R.; Van der Riet, Pamela Jane
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Eileen Mary Dowse, MN, RN, RM, Dip, CFHN(Karitane), GDipHlthSc, (Women's, Health), Eileen.Dowse@newcastle.edu.au; Diana R. Keatinge, PhD, MAdmin, G, Cert, TESOL, RN, RSCN; Pamela Jane Van der Riet, PhD, MEd, BA, RN
Abstract:

Rising Stars of Scholarship Invited Poster.

This study focuses on the factors that may influence the child and family health nurse’s ability to work in partnership with parents. The study was conducted during 2011 in the Child and Family Health Nursing (CFHN) Service which is a community based specialty that provides free primary health care to parents/carers and children aged 0-5 years in New South Wales, Australia.

Methods: Critical ethnography was the selected study design. Participants included CFHNs, their managers and client parents attending the service. Data were collected via audiotaped semi structured interviews; participant observation enhanced through use of digital video recordings of consultations between nurses and parents; and, field notes.

Results: Data analysis is ongoing. The preliminary findings indicate a number of positive influences and barriers that impact on CFHNs being able to work in a partnership approach with parents. These include the reflective capacity of the nurse; having a manager who models a partnership approach with nursing staff; and, time constraints.

Conclusion: While data analysis is in progress, this study showed the value that both nurses and clients place on a professional relationship based on partnership principles. It is anticipated that the findings  will guide future CFHN  policy and practice and enable a greater understanding of what the broader factors are that may influence positively or negatively their ability to work in partnership with their clients. Also, the emancipatory method used in this study (critical ethnography) has enabled the researcher and researched to view these influences more critically. Another significance of this study lies in its ability to enable methodological and conceptual developments in conducting research into the child and family health nursing specialty.

Keywords:
Child and family health nurse; Critical ethnography and Partnership
Repository Posting Date:
13-Dec-2012
Date of Publication:
13-Dec-2012
Conference Date:
2012
Conference Name:
23rd International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Brisbane, Australia

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryAbstracten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleThe factors influencing, and the nature of their impact, on the child and family health nurse's ability to work in partnership with parentsen_US
dc.contributor.authorDowse, Eileen-
dc.contributor.authorKeatinge, Diana R.-
dc.contributor.authorVan der Riet, Pamela Jane-
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsEileen Mary Dowse, MN, RN, RM, Dip, CFHN(Karitane), GDipHlthSc, (Women's, Health), Eileen.Dowse@newcastle.edu.au; Diana R. Keatinge, PhD, MAdmin, G, Cert, TESOL, RN, RSCN; Pamela Jane Van der Riet, PhD, MEd, BA, RNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/262576-
dc.description.abstract<p>Rising Stars of Scholarship Invited Poster.</p> <p>This study focuses on the factors that may influence the child and family health nurse&rsquo;s ability to work in partnership with parents. The study was conducted during 2011 in the Child and Family Health Nursing (CFHN) Service which is a community based specialty that provides free primary health care to parents/carers and children aged 0-5 years in New South Wales, Australia.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong> Critical ethnography was the selected study design. Participants included CFHNs, their managers and client parents attending the service. Data were collected via audiotaped semi structured interviews; participant observation enhanced through use of digital video recordings of consultations between nurses and parents; and, field notes.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> Data analysis is ongoing. The preliminary findings indicate a number of positive influences and barriers that impact on CFHNs being able to work in a partnership approach with parents. These include the reflective capacity of the nurse; having a manager who models a partnership approach with nursing staff; and, time constraints.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> While data analysis is in progress, this study showed the value that both nurses and clients place on a professional relationship based on partnership principles. It is anticipated that the findings&nbsp; will guide future CFHN&nbsp; policy and practice and enable a greater understanding of what the broader factors are that may influence positively or negatively their ability to work in partnership with their clients. Also, the emancipatory method used in this study (critical ethnography) has enabled the researcher and researched to view these influences more critically. Another significance of this study lies in its ability to enable methodological and conceptual developments in conducting research into the child and family health nursing specialty.</p>en_GB
dc.subjectChild and family health nurseen_GB
dc.subjectCritical ethnography and Partnershipen_GB
dc.date.available2012-12-13T20:39:59Z-
dc.date.issued2012-12-13-
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-13T20:39:59Z-
dc.conference.date2012en
dc.conference.name23rd International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationBrisbane, Australiaen_GB
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