2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/266694
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Research Study
Title:
The Development of the Simulation Thinking Rubric
Author(s):
Doolen, Jessica
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Zeta Kappa
Author Details:
Jessica Doolen, PhD, RN, FNP-C, CNE
Abstract:

Background: High fidelity simulation is a widespread pedagogical modality utilized in institutions of higher education and is considered an innovative and active student-centered learning strategy in nursing education. However, the use of high fidelity simulation (HFS) will not reach its potential effect in nursing education nor will there be justification for the cost and effort without evidence that HFS promotes cognitive gains in nursing students.

Purpose of the Study: The purpose of this study was to test a theoretically based instrument, the Simulation Thinking Rubric, which might be utilized to assess the cognitive developmental stage of higher order thinking in undergraduate nursing students during high fidelity simulation.

Summary of Study Aims:The study aims were to; 1) establish content validity with a content validity index, 2) provide evidence of construct validity with a contrasted group approach and an exploratory factor analysis, 3) provide evidence of internal consistency reliability and, 4) provide evidence of equivalence reliability with an inter-rater agreement procedure.

Theoretical Framework: Instructional methods that are active and student-centered, such as HFS, might facilitate the development of higher order thinking in undergraduate nursing students when based on a theory of learning. However, in nursing education, the development of HFS scenarios is not typically based on learning theory. Scenarios are most often based on nursing theory or a curriculum framework and are designed to meet course, level, and program outcomes. An alternative to the current foundation of curriculum framework for development ofHFS scenarios is the use and application of learning theory as suggested in the simulation based on language and learning (SIMBaLL) model.

Methods, Procedures and Sampling: A convenience sample of 22 first semester junior year and 22 fourth semester senior year undergraduate (BSN) nursing students were invited and signed consent to participate in the study. Each of the 44 BSN nursing students engaged in an HFS research scenario to allow six trained raters to score the Simulation Thinking Rubric.

Summary of Findings: Results for content validity were a scale content validity index average (S-CVI/Ave) of .9764 and a scale content validity average (CVI/UA) of .92857 that provide evidence of content validity of the STR. For construct validity, an exploratory factor analysis with a principal component analysis procedure produced four principal components that did not represent each of the four stages of cognitive development of higher order thinking (HOT). Instead, the analysis produced principle components for the preoperational and the concrete stages of cognitive development of HOT. In addition, a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated first semester junior year BSN students scored (M = 3.20, SD = 0.74) in the pre- operational stage and fourth semester senior year BSN students scored (M = 4.11, SD = 1.12) in the concrete stage of cognitive development of HOT. Although the sample size was small and the ANOVA findings were not statistically significant, the magnitude of the difference (␣2. 21) suggested there is an appreciable difference in HOT between first and fourth semester BSN students HOT. With respect to internal consistency reliability, a Cronbach’s alpha of .74 provided weak evidence that the STR was measuring the concept of HOT in four cognitive developmental stages.

Conclusion: The psychometric testing of the STR did not provide strong statistical evidence of validity or reliability. However, the knowledge gained from this study might assist other researchers in avoiding the same limitations in developing theoretically based evaluation instruments to measure higher order thinking related to high fidelity simulation.

Recommendations: The following recommendations are made for future research: (a) examine the literature for adult theories of learning, (b) conduct a concept analysis on the construct of HOT, (c) sample the domain of HOT based on the concept analysis, and (d) develop items for a new instrument.

Keywords:
baccalaureate nursing education; patient simulation; higher order thinking; learning theory
Repository Posting Date:
23-Jan-2013
Date of Publication:
23-Jan-2013
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Description:
Sigma Theta Tau International Joan K Stout Award
Note:
The Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.; This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryAbstracten
dc.typeResearch Studyen
dc.titleThe Development of the Simulation Thinking Rubricen_US
dc.contributor.authorDoolen, Jessica-
dc.contributor.departmentZeta Kappaen
dc.author.detailsJessica Doolen, PhD, RN, FNP-C, CNEen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/266694-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Background: </strong>High fidelity simulation is a widespread pedagogical modality utilized in institutions of higher education and is considered an innovative and active student-centered learning strategy in nursing education. However, the use of high fidelity simulation (HFS) will not reach its potential effect in nursing education nor will there be justification for the cost and effort without evidence that HFS promotes cognitive gains in nursing students.</p> <p><strong>Purpose of the Study: </strong>The purpose of this study was to test a theoretically based instrument, the Simulation Thinking Rubric, which might be utilized to assess the cognitive developmental stage of higher order thinking in undergraduate nursing students during high fidelity simulation.</p> <p><strong>Summary of Study Aims:</strong>The study aims were to; 1) establish content validity with a content validity index, 2) provide evidence of construct validity with a contrasted group approach and an exploratory factor analysis, 3) provide evidence of internal consistency reliability and, 4) provide evidence of equivalence reliability with an inter-rater agreement procedure.</p> <p><strong>Theoretical Framework: </strong>Instructional methods that are active and student-centered, such as HFS, might facilitate the development of higher order thinking in undergraduate nursing students when based on a theory of learning. However, in nursing education, the development of HFS scenarios is not typically based on learning theory. Scenarios are most often based on nursing theory or a curriculum framework and are designed to meet course, level, and program outcomes. An alternative to the current foundation of curriculum framework for development ofHFS scenarios is the use and application of learning theory as suggested in the simulation based on language and learning (SIMBaLL) model.</p> <p><strong>Methods, Procedures and Sampling: </strong>A convenience sample of 22 first semester junior year and 22 fourth semester senior year undergraduate (BSN) nursing students were invited and signed consent to participate in the study. Each of the 44 BSN nursing students engaged in an HFS research scenario to allow six trained raters to score the Simulation Thinking Rubric.</p> <p><strong>Summary of Findings: </strong>Results for content validity were a scale content validity index average (S-CVI/Ave) of .9764 and a scale content validity average (CVI/UA) of .92857 that provide evidence of content validity of the STR. For construct validity, an exploratory factor analysis with a principal component analysis procedure produced four principal components that did not represent each of the four stages of cognitive development of higher order thinking (HOT). Instead, the analysis produced principle components for the preoperational and the concrete stages of cognitive development of HOT. In addition, a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated first semester junior year BSN students scored (<em>M </em>= 3.20, <em>SD </em>= 0.74) in the pre- operational stage and fourth semester senior year BSN students scored (<em>M </em>= 4.11, <em>SD </em>= 1.12) in the concrete stage of cognitive development of HOT. Although the sample size was small and the ANOVA findings were not statistically significant, the magnitude of the difference (␣<span>2</span>. 21) suggested there is an appreciable difference in HOT between first and fourth semester BSN students HOT. With respect to internal consistency reliability, a Cronbach’s alpha of .74 provided weak evidence that the STR was measuring the concept of HOT in four cognitive developmental stages.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>The psychometric testing of the STR did not provide strong statistical evidence of validity or reliability. However, the knowledge gained from this study might assist other researchers in avoiding the same limitations in developing theoretically based evaluation instruments to measure higher order thinking related to high fidelity simulation.</p> <p><strong>Recommendations: </strong>The following recommendations are made for future research: (a) examine the literature for adult theories of learning, (b) conduct a concept analysis on the construct of HOT, (c) sample the domain of HOT based on the concept analysis, and (d) develop items for a new instrument.</p>en_GB
dc.subjectbaccalaureate nursing educationen_GB
dc.subjectpatient simulationen_GB
dc.subjecthigher order thinkingen_GB
dc.subjectlearning theoryen_GB
dc.date.available2013-01-23T13:56:10Z-
dc.date.issued2013-01-23-
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-23T13:56:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.descriptionSigma Theta Tau International Joan K Stout Awarden_GB
dc.description.noteThe Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.en
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item.-
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