2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/290937
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Compassion Fatigue Among Health Care Providers
Author(s):
Washington, Renice
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Pi Gamma
Author Details:
Renice Washington, FNP-C/CNS, rwashi10@gmail.com
Abstract:

Poster presented on Friday, April 12, 2013, Saturday, April 13, 2013

Compassion fatigue, a term initially coined by Figley (1995), describes secondary trauma stress incurred by helping professionals working with survivors of natural disasters and terrorism. Figley (1995) included health care professionals in this definition, since these providers often deal with unrelenting suffering.  A review of the literature reveals that compassion fatigue is often interchanged with the term burnout. Yoder (2010) differentiates compassion fatigue and burnout by yielding that compassion fatigue arises when one is unable to “rescue or save an individual from harm,” which leads to remorse.  In comparison, burnout is thought to arise from failure to meet personal goals, which results in frustration (Yoder, 2010, p. 191). According to Landro (2012), compassion fatigue leads to decreased job satisfaction, decreased job productivity, higher job turnover rates, and cynicism in the nursing arena.  All these factors can affect patient satisfaction and patient care outcomes.

While daily interventions are offered to provide support to patients and families, the effect of compassion fatigue upon caregivers can pose a threat to positive patient outcomes. While the literature provides support of the existence of compassion fatigue among select groups of healthcare providers, a paucity of research exists on the effect of compassion fatigue upon the entire team working with oncology patients. This presentation will provide information associated with the prevalence of compassion fatigue among members of the interdisciplinary healthcare team. Valid and reliable tools (ProQOL version 5) for measurement of compassion fatigue will be presented and reviewed, as well as the provision of successful interventions for reducing the presence of fatigue.

A healthy work environment requires that the manager and organization commit to recognizing factors that may affect the delivery of care.Caring for the caregiver(s) necessitates that managers seek measures to maintain healthy work environments.

Keywords:
Compassion Fatigue; Interprofessional; Oncology
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2013
Date of Publication:
13-May-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCompassion Fatigue Among Health Care Providersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWashington, Reniceen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentPi Gammaen_GB
dc.author.detailsRenice Washington, FNP-C/CNS, rwashi10@gmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/290937-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on Friday, April 12, 2013, Saturday, April 13, 2013</p> Compassion fatigue, a term initially coined by Figley (1995), describes secondary trauma stress incurred by helping professionals working with survivors of natural disasters and terrorism. Figley (1995) included health care professionals in this definition, since these providers often deal with unrelenting suffering.&nbsp; A review of the literature reveals that compassion fatigue is often interchanged with the term burnout. Yoder (2010) differentiates compassion fatigue and burnout by yielding that compassion fatigue arises when one is unable to &ldquo;rescue or save an individual from harm,&rdquo; which leads to remorse.&nbsp; In comparison, burnout is thought to arise from failure to meet personal goals, which results in frustration (Yoder, 2010, p. 191). According to Landro (2012), compassion fatigue leads to decreased job satisfaction, decreased job productivity, higher job turnover rates, and cynicism in the nursing arena.&nbsp; All these factors can affect patient satisfaction and patient care outcomes. <p>While daily interventions are offered to provide support to patients and families, the effect of compassion fatigue upon caregivers can pose a threat to positive patient outcomes. While the literature provides support of the existence of compassion fatigue among select groups of healthcare providers, a paucity of research exists on the effect of compassion fatigue upon the entire team working with oncology patients. This presentation will provide information associated with the prevalence of compassion fatigue among members of the interdisciplinary healthcare team. Valid and reliable tools (ProQOL version 5) for measurement of compassion fatigue will be presented and reviewed, as well as the provision of successful interventions for reducing the presence of fatigue. <p>A healthy work environment requires that the manager and organization commit to recognizing factors that may affect the delivery of care.Caring for the caregiver(s) necessitates that managers seek measures to maintain healthy work environments.en_GB
dc.subjectCompassion Fatigueen_GB
dc.subjectInterprofessionalen_GB
dc.subjectOncologyen_GB
dc.date.available2013-05-13T10:23:39Z-
dc.date.issued2013-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-13T10:23:39Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environmentsen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolisen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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