Generational Differences in Organizational Commitment of Hospital Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/290960
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Generational Differences in Organizational Commitment of Hospital Nurses
Author(s):
Gormley, Denise K.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Iota
Author Details:
Denise K. Gormley, PhD, RN, denise.gormley@uc.edu;
Abstract:

Poster presented on Friday, April 12, 2013, Saturday, April 13, 2013

Hospitals are reporting decreased RN attrition and vacancy rates, and increased retention as nurses return to the workforce, and put off retirement during the current economic downturn in the U. S, and there is currently an oversupply of RNs caused by the slowed economy. Nurses are increasing working hours from part-time to full-time; nurses are returning to work after having left the workforce; and  nurses contemplating retirement are postponing indefinitely.  Retaining older nurses in the workplace means that more and more hospitals are seeing multiple generations of nurses in the workforce. How these nurses demonstrate commitment to the organization has not been well studied, and how organizational commitment in multi-generations of nurses is related to productivity, patient safety and quality of care is not fully known. Meyer and Allen’s Multidimensional Model of Organizational Commitment provided the foundation for this research examining differences in organizational commitment among generations of nurses as it relates to productivity, patient safety and quality care. The model proposes that organizational commitment consists of three dimensions: affective, continuance, and normative. Consequences of the different dimensions of commitment affect the organization and the employee differently related to retention, productive behavior, and employee well-being.  The aim of this study was to explore differences in organizational commitment among generations of nurses related to productivity, patient safety and quality of care.  Findings demonstrate significant differences between generations of nurses in practice with older Baby Boomer nurses reporting lower organizational commitment, and decreased productivity related to cognitive demands, handling/managing workload, support/communication with patients/visitors, and safety/competency. Managers must recognize the critical factors in the work environment related to generational differences in the workforce to enhance healthy work environments, nurse commitment to the organization, and ultimately to patient outcomes.
Keywords:
organizational commitment; generational differences; nurse productivity
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2013
Date of Publication:
13-May-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGenerational Differences in Organizational Commitment of Hospital Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGormley, Denise K.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Iotaen_GB
dc.author.detailsDenise K. Gormley, PhD, RN, denise.gormley@uc.edu;en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/290960-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on Friday, April 12, 2013, Saturday, April 13, 2013</p>Hospitals are reporting decreased RN attrition and vacancy rates, and increased retention as nurses return to the workforce, and put off retirement during the current economic downturn in the U. S, and there is currently an oversupply of RNs caused by the slowed economy. Nurses are increasing working hours from part-time to full-time; nurses are returning to work after having left the workforce; and&nbsp; nurses contemplating retirement are postponing indefinitely.&nbsp; Retaining older nurses in the workplace means that more and more hospitals are seeing multiple generations of nurses in the workforce. How these nurses demonstrate commitment to the organization has not been well studied, and how organizational commitment in multi-generations of nurses is related to productivity, patient safety and quality of care is not fully known. Meyer and Allen&rsquo;s Multidimensional Model of Organizational Commitment provided the foundation for this research examining differences in organizational commitment among generations of nurses as it relates to productivity, patient safety and quality care. The model proposes that organizational commitment consists of three dimensions: affective, continuance, and normative. Consequences of the different dimensions of commitment affect the organization and the employee differently related to retention, productive behavior, and employee well-being.&nbsp; The aim of this study was to explore differences in organizational commitment among generations of nurses related to productivity, patient safety and quality of care.&nbsp; Findings demonstrate significant differences between generations of nurses in practice with older Baby Boomer nurses reporting lower organizational commitment, and decreased productivity related to cognitive demands, handling/managing workload, support/communication with patients/visitors, and safety/competency. Managers must recognize the critical factors in the work environment related to generational differences in the workforce to enhance healthy work environments, nurse commitment to the organization, and ultimately to patient outcomes.en_GB
dc.subjectorganizational commitmenten_GB
dc.subjectgenerational differencesen_GB
dc.subjectnurse productivityen_GB
dc.date.available2013-05-13T10:23:42Z-
dc.date.issued2013-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-13T10:23:42Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environmentsen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolisen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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