2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/290966
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of Interruptions during Medication Administration
Author(s):
Canny, Gina A.; Jesek-Hale, Sheila; Prasun, Marilyn A.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Ni Pi-at-Large
Author Details:
Gina A. Canny, MSN, edginacanny@aol.com; Sheila Jesek-Hale PhD; Marilyn A. Prasun PhD
Abstract:

Poster presented on Friday, April 12, 2013, Saturday, April 13, 2013

Medication administration is one of the most important parts of both the nurse’s and patient’s day.  One can attribute medication errors to being human but there are current system issues that prohibit an exemplar process for error and interruption free medication administration.  Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine interruptions that occurred during medication administration.  A descriptive pilot design was conducted at a Midwestern, 400 - bed hospital.  The participants completed a demographic form, the Modified Gladstone Survey and one question regarding their perception of the number of interruptions occurring during the medication pass.  The participants were then observed on two occasions administering medications for three hours with a five day break between medications pass observation.  The non obtrusive researcher documented interruptions by utilizing hash marks on the Medication Administration Distraction Observation Sheet (MADOS).  The total number medication interruptions were 427 (mean, 10.9; SD, 6.4).  The leading interruptions that occurred during medication administration were:  medication issues (92.3%), other personnel (84.6%) and conversation (74.4%).  Nurses perceived medication errors are reported to a nurse manager one fourth (35.3%) of the time via an incident report.  When nurses were asked about a missed dose of ampillicin, 58.8% did not consider this a drug error, 52.9% would not notify the physician and 76.5% would not complete an incident report.  Contrary to these responses, 94.1% stated they know what constitutes a medication error and would report utilizing an incident report.  Additionally, 52.9% stated they have failed to report a medication error because they did not think the error was serious.  These results reveal the variability among nurses when defining what constitutes a medication error.  This study supports the investment of more resources by healthcare agencies to prevent errors and interruptions of nurses during medication administration.
Keywords:
Interruptions; Patient Safety; Medication Errors
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2013
Date of Publication:
13-May-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of Interruptions during Medication Administrationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCanny, Gina A.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorJesek-Hale, Sheilaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPrasun, Marilyn A.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNi Pi-at-Largeen_GB
dc.author.detailsGina A. Canny, MSN, edginacanny@aol.com; Sheila Jesek-Hale PhD; Marilyn A. Prasun PhDen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/290966-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on Friday, April 12, 2013, Saturday, April 13, 2013</p>Medication administration is one of the most important parts of both the nurse&rsquo;s and patient&rsquo;s day.&nbsp; One can attribute medication errors to being human but there are current system issues that prohibit an exemplar process for error and interruption free medication administration.&nbsp; Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine interruptions that occurred during medication administration.&nbsp; A descriptive pilot design was conducted at a Midwestern, 400 - bed hospital.&nbsp; The participants completed a demographic form, the Modified Gladstone Survey and one question regarding their perception of the number of interruptions occurring during the medication pass.&nbsp; The participants were then observed on two occasions administering medications for three hours with a five day break between medications pass observation.&nbsp; The non obtrusive researcher documented interruptions by utilizing hash marks on the Medication Administration Distraction Observation Sheet (MADOS).&nbsp; The total number medication interruptions were 427 (mean, 10.9; SD, 6.4).&nbsp; The leading interruptions that occurred during medication administration were:&nbsp; medication issues (92.3%), other personnel (84.6%) and conversation (74.4%).&nbsp; Nurses perceived medication errors are reported to a nurse manager one fourth (35.3%) of the time via an incident report.&nbsp; When nurses were asked about a missed dose of ampillicin, 58.8% did not consider this a drug error, 52.9% would not notify the physician and 76.5% would not complete an incident report.&nbsp; Contrary to these responses, 94.1% stated they know what constitutes a medication error and would report utilizing an incident report.&nbsp; Additionally, 52.9% stated they have failed to report a medication error because they did not think the error was serious.&nbsp; These results reveal the variability among nurses when defining what constitutes a medication error.&nbsp; This study supports the investment of more resources by healthcare agencies to prevent errors and interruptions of nurses during medication administration.en_GB
dc.subjectInterruptionsen_GB
dc.subjectPatient Safetyen_GB
dc.subjectMedication Errorsen_GB
dc.date.available2013-05-13T10:23:48Z-
dc.date.issued2013-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-13T10:23:48Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environmentsen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolisen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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