Mind-Body Self-Care for Accelerated Nursing Students at Three Universities

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/290969
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mind-Body Self-Care for Accelerated Nursing Students at Three Universities
Author(s):
Drew, Barbara L.; Rababah, Jehad; Cameron Bozeman, Michelle; Goliat, Laura; Sharpnack, Patricia A.; Motter, Tracey; Govoni, Amy L.; Ross, Ratchneewan
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta Xi
Author Details:
Barbara L. Drew, PhD, bdrew@kent.edu; Amy L. Govoni MSN, RN, CS; Laura Goliat MSN; Ratchneewan Ross PhD, RN; Jehad Rababah MSN; Patricia A. Sharpnack DNP; Michelle Cameron Bozeman BSN; Tracey Motter MSN
Abstract:

Poster presented on Friday, April 12, 2013, Saturday, April 13, 2013

Extreme stress can impair learning and performance ultimately affecting, not only the accelerated nursing student, but also clinical decisions and communications. The purpose of this project was to replicate and substantially expand an evaluation of a curricular addition: experiential exposure to self-care modalities like yoga, aromatherapy, Reiki and mindful breathing based on the Urban Zen Integrative Therapy (UZIT) program. The goal was to help students regulate stress, gain a more mindful awareness of self and others, and increase their knowledge of complimentary therapies. Findings from an earlier pilot, suggested that mind-body self-care supported students' ability to regulate their experience of stress throughout the semester. With this project, we addressed limitations of the pilot by including accelerated nursing students from three universities. During spring 2012 mind-body self-care modalities were introduced into the first semester curriculum in two of the universities (Time 1 n=50). The comparison group at the third university was only given an educational pamphlet on stress management, (Time 1 n=63).  Using a quasi-experimental design, we collected data at the beginning, middle, and end of the semester and beginning of the fall semester using Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile II, Perceived Stress Scale, and Mindful Attention Awareness Scale. We hypothesized that students who participated in mind-body self-care practice 1) perceived less stress and had a greater capacity for mindful attention from the beginning to end of the semester, 2) perceived less stress and more mindfulness at the end of the semester compared to students in the control group, and 3) sustained changes in stress and mindfulness at the beginning of the Fall 2012 semester.  We will use descriptive statistics to describe the sample, determine reliability of measures, and examine baseline differences between the groups. The mean differences between and within groups, while controlling for HPLP II, will be tested using RM-ANCOVA.
Keywords:
self-care; mindfulness; nursing students
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2013
Date of Publication:
13-May-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMind-Body Self-Care for Accelerated Nursing Students at Three Universitiesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDrew, Barbara L.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorRababah, Jehaden_GB
dc.contributor.authorCameron Bozeman, Michelleen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGoliat, Lauraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSharpnack, Patricia A.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorMotter, Traceyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGovoni, Amy L.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorRoss, Ratchneewanen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDelta Xien_GB
dc.author.detailsBarbara L. Drew, PhD, bdrew@kent.edu; Amy L. Govoni MSN, RN, CS; Laura Goliat MSN; Ratchneewan Ross PhD, RN; Jehad Rababah MSN; Patricia A. Sharpnack DNP; Michelle Cameron Bozeman BSN; Tracey Motter MSNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/290969-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on Friday, April 12, 2013, Saturday, April 13, 2013</p>Extreme stress can impair learning and performance ultimately affecting, not only the accelerated nursing student, but also clinical decisions and communications. The purpose of this project was to replicate and substantially expand an evaluation of a curricular addition: experiential exposure to self-care modalities like yoga, aromatherapy, Reiki and mindful breathing based on the Urban Zen Integrative Therapy (UZIT) program. The goal was to help students regulate stress, gain a more mindful awareness of self and others, and increase their knowledge of complimentary therapies. Findings from an earlier pilot, suggested that mind-body self-care supported students' ability to regulate their experience of stress throughout the semester. With this project, we addressed limitations of the pilot by including accelerated nursing students from three universities. During spring 2012 mind-body self-care modalities were introduced into the first semester curriculum in two of the universities (Time 1 n=50). The comparison group at the third university was only given an educational pamphlet on stress management, (Time 1 n=63). &nbsp;Using a quasi-experimental design, we collected data at the beginning, middle, and end of the semester and beginning of the fall semester using Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile II, Perceived Stress Scale, and Mindful Attention Awareness Scale. We hypothesized that students who participated in mind-body self-care practice 1) perceived less stress and had a greater capacity for mindful attention from the beginning to end of the semester, 2) perceived less stress and more mindfulness at the end of the semester compared to students in the control group, and 3) sustained changes in stress and mindfulness at the beginning of the Fall 2012 semester. &nbsp;We will use descriptive statistics to describe the sample, determine reliability of measures, and examine baseline differences between the groups. The mean differences between and within groups, while controlling for HPLP II, will be tested using RM-ANCOVA.en_GB
dc.subjectself-careen_GB
dc.subjectmindfulnessen_GB
dc.subjectnursing studentsen_GB
dc.date.available2013-05-13T10:23:51Z-
dc.date.issued2013-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-13T10:23:51Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environmentsen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolisen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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