Staff Nurse Recommendations for Managing Conflict and Improving Workplace Culture

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/290971
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Staff Nurse Recommendations for Managing Conflict and Improving Workplace Culture
Author(s):
Lux, Kathleen M.; Hutcheson, Jane B.; Peden, Ann R.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Theta Theta
Author Details:
Kathleen M. Lux, PhD, RN-BC, CHES, klux@capital.edu; Ann R. Peden CNS, DSN; Jane B. Hutcheson MS, BSN
Abstract:

Poster presented on Friday, April 12, 2013, Saturday, April 13, 2013

The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to identify educational strategies that can prepare new graduates to manage disruptive behavior (DB) in the workplace. Rosenstein (2011) defines DB as any inappropriate behavior, confrontation, or conflict – ranging from verbal abuse to sexual harassment – that harms or intimidates others to the extent that quality of care or patient safety could be compromised.

Individual interviews lasting between 40 – 60 minutes were conducted with nine staff nurses currently in practice using an interview guide.  Content analysis procedures guided data analysis.  Once all data were coded, the codes were sorted into categories, and then into larger themes. To assure trustworthiness of the findings, verification procedures described by Creswell (1998) were used.  To decrease researcher bias, the investigators met to share their personal assumptions about DB  prior to coding. To assure that the data were accurately coded, interrater reliability was established prior to data analysis. To verify the accuracy of our findings, member checks were conducted with three participants.  They were presented with the study findings and asked to verify the accuracy of the findings. All agreed that the findings did reflect their experiences related to DB.  

Staff nurses recommended education on communication skills, especially learning how to communicate with hostile individuals, and helping students realize that an important part of the communication process is giving and receiving constructive criticism. Descriptions that participants provided about their work culture were an unexpected finding that has relevance for nursing education. Nurses described lack of management support and interventions for conflict resolution, personality clashes with coworkers and devaluation of nursing work as their major concerns.

Keywords:
Qualitative methods; Conflict management; Disruptive behavior
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2013
Date of Publication:
13-May-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStaff Nurse Recommendations for Managing Conflict and Improving Workplace Cultureen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLux, Kathleen M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorHutcheson, Jane B.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorPeden, Ann R.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentTheta Thetaen_GB
dc.author.detailsKathleen M. Lux, PhD, RN-BC, CHES, klux@capital.edu; Ann R. Peden CNS, DSN; Jane B. Hutcheson MS, BSNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/290971-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on Friday, April 12, 2013, Saturday, April 13, 2013</p>The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to identify educational strategies that can prepare new graduates to manage disruptive behavior (DB) in the workplace. Rosenstein (2011) defines DB as any inappropriate behavior, confrontation, or conflict &ndash; ranging from verbal abuse to sexual harassment &ndash; that harms or intimidates others to the extent that quality of care or patient safety could be compromised. <p>Individual interviews lasting between 40 &ndash; 60 minutes were conducted with nine staff nurses currently in practice using an interview guide.&nbsp; Content analysis procedures guided data analysis.&nbsp; Once all data were coded, the codes were sorted into categories, and then into larger themes. To assure trustworthiness of the findings, verification procedures described by Creswell (1998) were used.&nbsp; To decrease researcher bias, the investigators met to share their personal assumptions about DB&nbsp; prior to coding. To assure that the data were accurately coded, interrater reliability was established prior to data analysis.&nbsp;To verify the accuracy of our findings, member checks were conducted with three participants.&nbsp; They were presented with the study findings and asked to verify the accuracy of the findings. All agreed that the findings did reflect their experiences related to DB. &nbsp; <p>Staff nurses recommended education on communication skills, especially learning how to communicate with hostile individuals, and helping students realize that an important part of the communication process is giving and receiving constructive criticism. Descriptions that participants provided about their work culture were an unexpected finding that has relevance for nursing education. Nurses described lack of management support and interventions for conflict resolution, personality clashes with coworkers and devaluation of nursing work as their major concerns.en_GB
dc.subjectQualitative methodsen_GB
dc.subjectConflict managementen_GB
dc.subjectDisruptive behavioren_GB
dc.date.available2013-05-13T10:23:56Z-
dc.date.issued2013-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-13T10:23:56Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environmentsen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolisen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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