Ethical Decision-Making Preferences and Associated Moral Distress in Inpatient Nursing Staff

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/290981
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ethical Decision-Making Preferences and Associated Moral Distress in Inpatient Nursing Staff
Author(s):
Estes, Tracy; Spangler, Haywood; Tuck, Inez
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Omega
Author Details:
Tracy Estes, PhD, RN, FNP-BC, tsestes@southuniversity.edu; Haywood Spangler, PhD; Inez Tuck, RN, PhD, MBA
Abstract:

Session presented on Saturday, April 13, 2013

Nurses are the backbone of the healthcare environment and shoulder many stresses through the day-to-day care of patients and their families. Among the many stressors nurses face in the healthcare environment, ethical dilemmas are of major concern. Due to the ambiguity of the ethical situation and the different ethical decision-making preferences people hold, ethical dilemmas can cause serious moral distress among nurses facing them. With this in mind, informing nurses about ethical decision-making preferences may facilitate more effective decision-making when faced with an ethical dilemma and those with other ethical decision-making preferences.

The Spangler Ethical Reasoning Assessment (SERA) items are based on research in rational decision theory and a spectrum of philosophical ethical theories (including feminist, Kantian, liberal-individualist, communitarian, and principle-based common-morality theory).  The SERA connects theory and praxis by showing nurses which type of ethical theory they routinely apply in their professional, day-to-day decision-making.

Keywords:
Ethics; Moral distress; Decision-making
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2013
Date of Publication:
13-May-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEthical Decision-Making Preferences and Associated Moral Distress in Inpatient Nursing Staffen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEstes, Tracyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSpangler, Haywooden_GB
dc.contributor.authorTuck, Inezen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Omegaen_GB
dc.author.detailsTracy Estes, PhD, RN, FNP-BC, tsestes@southuniversity.edu; Haywood Spangler, PhD; Inez Tuck, RN, PhD, MBAen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/290981-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on Saturday, April 13, 2013</p>Nurses are the backbone of the healthcare environment and shoulder many stresses through the day-to-day care of patients and their families. Among the many stressors nurses face in the healthcare environment, ethical dilemmas are of major concern. Due to the ambiguity of the ethical situation and the different ethical decision-making preferences people hold, ethical dilemmas can cause serious moral distress among nurses facing them. With this in mind, informing nurses about ethical decision-making preferences may facilitate more effective decision-making when faced with an ethical dilemma and those with other ethical decision-making preferences. <p>The Spangler Ethical Reasoning Assessment (SERA) items are based on research in rational decision theory and a spectrum of philosophical ethical theories (including feminist, Kantian, liberal-individualist, communitarian, and principle-based common-morality theory).&nbsp; The SERA connects theory and praxis by showing nurses which type of ethical theory they routinely apply in their professional, day-to-day decision-making.en_GB
dc.subjectEthicsen_GB
dc.subjectMoral distressen_GB
dc.subjectDecision-makingen_GB
dc.date.available2013-05-13T10:24:05Z-
dc.date.issued2013-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-13T10:24:05Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environmentsen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolisen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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