2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/290986
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Conflict Engagement Skill Building for Nurse Residents
Author(s):
Inglis, Rebecca L.; Schaper, Ana M.; Swartz, Stephanie L.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Pi Phi
Author Details:
Rebecca L. Inglis, MSN, RN, rlinglis@gundluth.org; Ana M. Schaper, PhD, RN; Stephanie L Swartz, MA, RN
Abstract:

Session presented on Sunday, April 14, 2013

The experience of incivility in higher education may influence how well a newly graduated nurse deals with conflict and disruptive behaviors in the workplace. Newly registered nurses frequently report acts of disrespect and destructive conflict. Research has shown that newly registered nurses report high levels of stress and illness after transitioning to practice resulting in 27% to 53% of new graduates leaving their job in the first year of work (Laschinger et al., 2009; Setter et al., 2011). One strategy recommended for supporting new nurses is through the development of conflict skills during nurse residency programs (Dyess & Sherman, 2009; Thomas, 2010). A modified Conflict Engagement program, advocated by the American Nurse Association, was delivered to 45 nurse residents. The program included a 4-hour workshop followed by one-hour monthly meetings termed “Learning Circles” for six months. The Learning Circles provide residents with opportunities to address strong negative emotional responses to conflict (hot buttons) and practice constructive strategies when engaging in conflict. Learning Circles incorporated role modeling, role play, and case studies of conflict situations. The trainers also provided personal consultation to help new nurses address unique conflict situations. Nurse residents easily identified previous experiences of incivility in nursing education, including incivility between nursing staff and nursing students during a clinical rotation. However, in beginning to explore incivility and destructive conflict in the workplace, the residents viewed these behaviors as juvenile. They did not expect to experience incivility as a new nurse. Personal experiences with conflict, particularly generational conflict, emerged as an influencing factor in understanding the value of conflict engagement training. Between the third and fourth Learning Circle a majority of residents began to recognize how their own behaviors influenced the escalation or de-escalation of conflict.
Keywords:
conflict; intradisciplinary collaboration; bullying
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2013
Date of Publication:
13-May-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleConflict Engagement Skill Building for Nurse Residentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorInglis, Rebecca L.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchaper, Ana M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorSwartz, Stephanie L.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentPi Phien_GB
dc.author.detailsRebecca L. Inglis, MSN, RN, rlinglis@gundluth.org; Ana M. Schaper, PhD, RN; Stephanie L Swartz, MA, RNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/290986-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on Sunday, April 14, 2013</p>The experience of incivility in higher education may influence how well a newly graduated nurse deals with conflict and disruptive behaviors in the workplace. Newly registered nurses frequently report acts of disrespect and destructive conflict. Research has shown that newly registered nurses report high levels of stress and illness after transitioning to practice resulting in 27% to 53% of new graduates leaving their job in the first year of work (Laschinger et al., 2009; Setter et al., 2011). One strategy recommended for supporting new nurses is through the development of conflict skills during nurse residency programs (Dyess &amp; Sherman, 2009; Thomas, 2010). A modified Conflict Engagement program, advocated by the American Nurse Association, was delivered to 45 nurse residents. The program included a 4-hour workshop followed by one-hour monthly meetings termed &ldquo;Learning Circles&rdquo; for six months. The Learning Circles provide residents with opportunities to address strong negative emotional responses to conflict (hot buttons) and practice constructive strategies when engaging in conflict. Learning Circles incorporated role modeling, role play, and case studies of conflict situations. The trainers also provided personal consultation to help new nurses address unique conflict situations. Nurse residents easily identified previous experiences of incivility in nursing education, including incivility between nursing staff and nursing students during a clinical rotation. However, in beginning to explore incivility and destructive conflict in the workplace, the residents viewed these behaviors as juvenile. They did not expect to experience incivility as a new nurse. Personal experiences with conflict, particularly generational conflict, emerged as an influencing factor in understanding the value of conflict engagement training. Between the third and fourth Learning Circle a majority of residents began to recognize how their own behaviors influenced the escalation or de-escalation of conflict.en_GB
dc.subjectconflicten_GB
dc.subjectintradisciplinary collaborationen_GB
dc.subjectbullyingen_GB
dc.date.available2013-05-13T10:24:10Z-
dc.date.issued2013-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-13T10:24:10Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environmentsen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolisen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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