Creating Space for an Open Dialogue on Generational Conflict Between New Nurses and Wisdom Workers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/290987
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Creating Space for an Open Dialogue on Generational Conflict Between New Nurses and Wisdom Workers
Author(s):
Schaper, Ana M.; Inglis, Rebecca L.; Newberry, Shirley M.; Gerke, Mary Lu; Hayter, Karen L.; Blackbourn, Jill L.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Pi Phi
Author Details:
Ana M. Schaper, PhD, RN, amschape@gundluth.org; Rebecca L. Inglis, MSN, RN; Shirley M. Newberry, PhD, RN; Mary Lu Gerke, PhD, RN; Karen L Hayter, MS, RN; Jill L Blackbourn, RN
Abstract:

Session presented on Sunday, April 14, 2013

Civility and conflict in the workplace have implications for healthy work environments and the retention of nurses. Nurses, aged 55 and older, were invited to participate in a celebration of experienced nurses as seasoned Wisdom Workers (SWW) (Jeste et al., 2010). SWW identified generational differences among the current challenges they face in sharing their wisdom with new nurses (NNs). Similarly, NN residents identified generational differences as challenging and leading to conflict in the workplace. To explore ways in which SWWs and NNs could foster wisdom development, SWWs were invited to join a celebration honoring NNs’ completion of the residency program.

SWWs and NNs, meeting as separate cohorts, reflected on the most satisfying and challenging aspects of working with the other generation. NNs perceived SWWs as excellent clinical resources. NNs highlighted “parenting” qualities of the SWW including building their self-esteem, protecting them, offering support and demonstrating patience. From the SWW perspective, NN were valued for their enthusiasm and energy. NNs were seen as risk-takers, open to new ideas, viewing failure as a learning opportunity and being masters of technology. However, NNs perceived the SWWs’ resistance to change, including the use of new technology, as frustrating. NNs voiced concern that some of the seasoned nurses were “burned out”.  SWWs viewed the NNs preferred communication style of texting compared to face-to-face communication as a challenging difference. SWWs questioned the multi-tasking abilities of NNs and the generational differences in work-life balance priorities. Each generational cohort identified questions that needed to be answered to define the future of collaborative nursing practice. In small group work, SWWs and NNs together created personal definitions of nursing that they would take forward in their careers. Both generations appreciated the time spent together in open dialogue, an imperative for conflict competence and creating a culture of civility.

Keywords:
Nurse Residents; Nurse Wisdom Workers; Intradisciplinary collaboration
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2013
Date of Publication:
13-May-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCreating Space for an Open Dialogue on Generational Conflict Between New Nurses and Wisdom Workersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchaper, Ana M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorInglis, Rebecca L.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorNewberry, Shirley M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorGerke, Mary Luen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHayter, Karen L.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBlackbourn, Jill L.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentPi Phien_GB
dc.author.detailsAna M. Schaper, PhD, RN, amschape@gundluth.org; Rebecca L. Inglis, MSN, RN; Shirley M. Newberry, PhD, RN; Mary Lu Gerke, PhD, RN; Karen L Hayter, MS, RN; Jill L Blackbourn, RNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/290987-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on Sunday, April 14, 2013</p>Civility and conflict in the workplace have implications for healthy work environments and the retention of nurses. Nurses, aged 55 and older, were invited to participate in a celebration of experienced nurses as seasoned Wisdom Workers (SWW) (Jeste et al., 2010). SWW identified generational differences among the current challenges they face in sharing their wisdom with new nurses (NNs). Similarly, NN residents identified generational differences as challenging and leading to conflict in the workplace. To explore ways in which SWWs and NNs could foster wisdom development, SWWs were invited to join a celebration honoring NNs&rsquo; completion of the residency program. <p>SWWs and NNs, meeting as separate cohorts, reflected on the most satisfying and challenging aspects of working with the other generation. NNs perceived SWWs as excellent clinical resources. NNs highlighted &ldquo;parenting&rdquo; qualities of the SWW including building their self-esteem, protecting them, offering support and demonstrating patience. From the SWW perspective, NN were valued for their enthusiasm and energy. NNs were seen as risk-takers, open to new ideas, viewing failure as a learning opportunity and being masters of technology. However, NNs perceived the SWWs&rsquo; resistance to change, including the use of new technology, as frustrating. NNs voiced concern that some of the seasoned nurses were &ldquo;burned out&rdquo;.&nbsp; SWWs viewed the NNs preferred communication style of texting compared to face-to-face communication as a challenging difference. SWWs questioned the multi-tasking abilities of NNs and the generational differences in work-life balance priorities. Each generational cohort identified questions that needed to be answered to define the future of collaborative nursing practice. In small group work, SWWs and NNs together created personal definitions of nursing that they would take forward in their careers. Both generations appreciated the time spent together in open dialogue, an imperative for conflict competence and creating a culture of civility.en_GB
dc.subjectNurse Residentsen_GB
dc.subjectNurse Wisdom Workersen_GB
dc.subjectIntradisciplinary collaborationen_GB
dc.date.available2013-05-13T10:24:11Z-
dc.date.issued2013-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-13T10:24:11Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environmentsen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolisen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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