The Role of Stakeholder Engagement and Interdisciplinary Collaboration in an Evidenced-Based Practice Program to Promote and Support Breastfeeding

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/290992
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Role of Stakeholder Engagement and Interdisciplinary Collaboration in an Evidenced-Based Practice Program to Promote and Support Breastfeeding
Author(s):
Damstra, Kelli M.; Scott, Linda D.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Kappa Epsilon-at-Large
Author Details:
Kelli M Damstra, DNP, MSN, RN, damstrak@gvsu.edu; Linda D. Scott, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN
Abstract:

Poster presented on Friday, April 12, 2013, Saturday, April 13, 2013

Evidence from the literature overwhelmingly indicates that breastfeeding is globally accepted as the gold standard for infant nutrition and is the optimal choice of feeding.  Focusing on efforts to support and promote breastfeeding through following recommendations of evidence-based practices such as the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) is an effective way to target the existing low breastfeeding rates and improve health outcomes.  The purpose of this practice dissertation project was to work in collaboration with a community hospital on the BFHI designation pathway by specifically implementing breastfeeding education (Step three of the guidelines).

Using the conceptual frameworks of both Donabedian and Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy theory, a multi-faceted approach was implemented targeting all pregnant women in this organization's affiliated prenatal clinic.  Helping to create transformational change in organizational culture at the system level resulted in the development of the prenatal educational program (PEP). Healthcare providers and office staff delivered breastfeeding education and support to patients as a component of their routine care.

Preliminary evaluation of the PEP did not indicate that there was a difference in the short-term outcomes of breastfeeding knowledge, self-efficacy, and intent. However, significant differences were found in both the pre-intervention and post-intervention assessments in that women who planned to breastfeed had higher confidence in breastfeeding knowledge and self-efficacy when compared to women who were undecided or did not intend to breastfeed.

Practice implications exist related to interdisciplinary collaboration, strategic leadership, and systems change. A fundamental component of implementation science is that leadership engagement is a crucial factor because of the commitment, involvement, and accountability that influences the execution of a systems-level change such as the BFHI.Engagement of key stakeholders was instrumental in facilitating an organizational climate ready for implementation of evidence-based practices to provide breastfeeding education and support, and to improve health outcomes at the community level.

Keywords:
Interprofessional collaboration; Breastfeeding Outcomes; Leadership Engagement
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2013
Date of Publication:
13-May-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Role of Stakeholder Engagement and Interdisciplinary Collaboration in an Evidenced-Based Practice Program to Promote and Support Breastfeedingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDamstra, Kelli M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorScott, Linda D.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentKappa Epsilon-at-Largeen_GB
dc.author.detailsKelli M Damstra, DNP, MSN, RN, damstrak@gvsu.edu; Linda D. Scott, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, FAANen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/290992-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on Friday, April 12, 2013, Saturday, April 13, 2013</p>Evidence from the literature overwhelmingly indicates that breastfeeding is globally accepted as the gold standard for infant nutrition and is the optimal choice of feeding.&nbsp; Focusing on efforts to support and promote breastfeeding through following recommendations of evidence-based practices such as the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) is an effective way to target the existing low breastfeeding rates and improve health outcomes.&nbsp; The purpose of this practice dissertation project was to work in collaboration with a community hospital on the BFHI designation pathway by specifically implementing breastfeeding education (Step three of the guidelines). <p>Using the conceptual frameworks of both Donabedian and Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy theory, a multi-faceted approach was implemented targeting all pregnant women in this organization's affiliated prenatal clinic.&nbsp; Helping to create transformational change in organizational culture at the system level resulted in the development of the prenatal educational program (PEP). Healthcare providers and office staff delivered breastfeeding education and support to patients as a component of their routine care.<p>Preliminary evaluation of the PEP did not indicate that there was a difference in the short-term outcomes of breastfeeding knowledge, self-efficacy, and intent. However, significant differences were found in both the pre-intervention and post-intervention assessments in that women who planned to breastfeed had higher confidence in breastfeeding knowledge and self-efficacy when compared to women who were undecided or did not intend to breastfeed. <p>Practice implications exist related to interdisciplinary collaboration, strategic leadership, and systems change. A fundamental component of implementation science is that leadership engagement is a crucial factor because of the commitment, involvement, and accountability that influences the execution of a systems-level change such as the BFHI.Engagement of key stakeholders was instrumental in facilitating an organizational climate ready for implementation of evidence-based practices to provide breastfeeding education and support, and to improve health outcomes at the community level.en_GB
dc.subjectInterprofessional collaborationen_GB
dc.subjectBreastfeeding Outcomesen_GB
dc.subjectLeadership Engagementen_GB
dc.date.available2013-05-13T10:24:16Z-
dc.date.issued2013-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-13T10:24:16Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environmentsen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolisen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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