2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/291000
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mandatory Nurse Staffing Models for Patient Safety
Author(s):
Silas, Linda
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Linda Silas, RN, BScN, president@nursesunions.ca
Abstract:

Session presented on Saturday, April 13, 2013

Dynamic, shared decision making models of nurse staffing that incorporate both patient factors and nurse characteristics provide a process where frontline nurses have direct input into staffing decisions. Innovative methods of blending staffing solutions such as nurse patient ratios with more dynamic models (like Synergy Professional Practice Model) create systems that rely on direct and ongoing input from front line nurses.

This presentation, based on recent research by the Canadian Federation of Nurses Unions on workload and patient care, will review the effects of excessive workload and how staffing models can help by taking the dynamic nature of nursing and patient care into consideration.

American and Australian research and policies have shown that nurse-patient ratios not only provide patients with better quality care, they also save lives. This presentation will identify valuable lessons learned from the implementation of unique staffing models in Canada, including the importance of engaging frontline staff in the day-to-day decision making with respect to patient assignments. Positive results observed from the research include improved engagement and empowerment of frontline staff, which are linked to lower nurse turnover and better patient care. The ability of nursing staff to maximize their leadership skills, decision-making abilities, professional competencies and judgement is enhanced by this intervention.

Excessive nurse workload is dangerous and an issue that health leaders can not afford to ignore. Cuts to nurse staffing are common, despite the fact that they are not supported by the evidence. Research suggests that nursing workload issues can be effectively addressed in a cost-effective manner by focusing on safe staffing mechanisms that are dynamic and collaborative.

Access to real-time, responsive mechanisms that give nurses the autonomy and authority to ensure the delivery of safe, quality patient care, while also contributing to the viability of health care systems, is critical to appropriate staffing.

Keywords:
Staffing; Safety; Dynamic
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2013
Date of Publication:
13-May-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryFull-texten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMandatory Nurse Staffing Models for Patient Safetyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSilas, Lindaen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsLinda Silas, RN, BScN, president@nursesunions.caen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/291000-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on Saturday, April 13, 2013</p>Dynamic, shared decision making models of nurse staffing that incorporate both patient factors and nurse characteristics provide a process where frontline nurses have direct input into staffing decisions. Innovative methods of blending staffing solutions such as nurse patient ratios with more dynamic models (like Synergy Professional Practice Model) create systems that rely on direct and ongoing input from front line nurses. <p>This presentation, based on recent research by the Canadian Federation of Nurses Unions on workload and patient care, will review the effects of excessive workload and how staffing models can help by taking the dynamic nature of nursing and patient care into consideration. <p>American and Australian research and policies have shown that nurse-patient ratios not only provide patients with better quality care, they also save lives. This presentation will identify valuable lessons learned from the implementation of unique staffing models in Canada, including the importance of engaging frontline staff in the day-to-day decision making with respect to patient assignments. Positive results observed from the research include improved engagement and empowerment of frontline staff, which are linked to lower nurse turnover and better patient care. The ability of nursing staff to maximize their leadership skills, decision-making abilities, professional competencies and judgement is enhanced by this intervention. <p>Excessive nurse workload is dangerous and an issue that health leaders can not afford to ignore. Cuts to nurse staffing are common, despite the fact that they are not supported by the evidence. Research suggests that nursing workload issues can be effectively addressed in a cost-effective manner by focusing on safe staffing mechanisms that are dynamic and collaborative. <p>Access to real-time, responsive mechanisms that give nurses the autonomy and authority to ensure the delivery of safe, quality patient care, while also contributing to the viability of health care systems, is critical to appropriate staffing.en_GB
dc.subjectStaffingen_GB
dc.subjectSafetyen_GB
dc.subjectDynamicen_GB
dc.date.available2013-05-13T10:26:00Z-
dc.date.issued2013-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-13T10:26:00Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environmentsen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolisen_GB
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