Work Stress/Strain, Low Job Satisfaction, and Intent to Leave Home Healthcare Nursing Among Home Healthcare Registered Nurses (HHC RNs)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/291006
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Work Stress/Strain, Low Job Satisfaction, and Intent to Leave Home Healthcare Nursing Among Home Healthcare Registered Nurses (HHC RNs)
Other Titles:
Clinical Session: Creative Staffing Strategies
Author(s):
Barker, D. Paxson
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Pi
Author Details:
D. Paxson Barker, PhD, MS, BS, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, April 13, 2013: Background: The U.S. shortage of Home Health Care (HHC) Registered Nurses (RNs) is growing and the demand for HHC RNs is estimated to increase 109% by 2020. Factors associated with this shortage of HHC nurses include job stress/strain and low job satisfaction. Predictors of intent to leave their present HHC nursing position are not clear. To date, no published studies have been found that apply the effort-reward imbalance (ERI) model to HHC RNs. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to measure the level of job stress/strain associated with a low job satisfaction and intent to leave reported by HHC RNs practicing in the state of Maryland. Methods: This is a secondary analysis of the data collected from 794 HHC RNs participating in a 2006 study exploring hazard exposures in homecare. A mixed-methods analysis was conducted including quantitative and qualitative analysis. Results: Of the 206 HHC RNs that provided a narrative, 27.2% (n=56) reported an intent to leave or had already left their HHC positions. The six most frequent categories reported in the HHC RNs narratives included; negative organizational traits, work stress, love homecare, overwhelming paperwork, inadequate financial compensation, nurse attrition/intent to leave. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated reward as a significant predictor of good job satisfaction for all groups. Overcommitment and effort were significant predictors of low job satisfaction. Elevated ERI scores were reported for respondents with (77.2%) and without (35.0%) narratives indicating the respondents with narratives reported a higher incidence of elevated ERI scores compared to those without narratives. Conclusions: Many HHC RNs noted improvement is needed in their work environment. Job strain/stress is evident among HHC RNs and aspects of effort, reward, and overcommitment were found to be associated with low job satisfaction but no association with intent to leave.
Keywords:
Home Health Care Registered Nurse (HHC RN); work stress; Effort Reward Imbalance
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2013
Date of Publication:
13-May-2013
Other Identifiers:
CHWE13CC03
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleWork Stress/Strain, Low Job Satisfaction, and Intent to Leave Home Healthcare Nursing Among Home Healthcare Registered Nurses (HHC RNs)en
dc.title.alternativeClinical Session: Creative Staffing Strategiesen
dc.contributor.authorBarker, D. Paxsonen
dc.contributor.departmentPien
dc.author.detailsD. Paxson Barker, PhD, MS, BS, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/291006-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, April 13, 2013: Background: The U.S. shortage of Home Health Care (HHC) Registered Nurses (RNs) is growing and the demand for HHC RNs is estimated to increase 109% by 2020. Factors associated with this shortage of HHC nurses include job stress/strain and low job satisfaction. Predictors of intent to leave their present HHC nursing position are not clear. To date, no published studies have been found that apply the effort-reward imbalance (ERI) model to HHC RNs. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to measure the level of job stress/strain associated with a low job satisfaction and intent to leave reported by HHC RNs practicing in the state of Maryland. Methods: This is a secondary analysis of the data collected from 794 HHC RNs participating in a 2006 study exploring hazard exposures in homecare. A mixed-methods analysis was conducted including quantitative and qualitative analysis. Results: Of the 206 HHC RNs that provided a narrative, 27.2% (n=56) reported an intent to leave or had already left their HHC positions. The six most frequent categories reported in the HHC RNs narratives included; negative organizational traits, work stress, love homecare, overwhelming paperwork, inadequate financial compensation, nurse attrition/intent to leave. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated reward as a significant predictor of good job satisfaction for all groups. Overcommitment and effort were significant predictors of low job satisfaction. Elevated ERI scores were reported for respondents with (77.2%) and without (35.0%) narratives indicating the respondents with narratives reported a higher incidence of elevated ERI scores compared to those without narratives. Conclusions: Many HHC RNs noted improvement is needed in their work environment. Job strain/stress is evident among HHC RNs and aspects of effort, reward, and overcommitment were found to be associated with low job satisfaction but no association with intent to leave.en
dc.subjectHome Health Care Registered Nurse (HHC RN)en
dc.subjectwork stressen
dc.subjectEffort Reward Imbalanceen
dc.date.available2013-05-13T10:26:12Z-
dc.date.issued2013-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-13T10:26:12Z-
dc.conference.date2013en
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environmentsen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolisen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.