Work Stress/Strain, Low Job Satisfaction, and Intent to Leave Home Healthcare Nursing Among Home Healthcare Registered Nurses (HHC RNs)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/291006
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Work Stress/Strain, Low Job Satisfaction, and Intent to Leave Home Healthcare Nursing Among Home Healthcare Registered Nurses (HHC RNs)
Author(s):
Barker, D. Paxson
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Pi
Author Details:
D. Paxson Barker, PhD, MS, BS, RN, paxson.barker@gmail.com
Abstract:

Session presented on Saturday, April 13, 2013

Background: The U.S. shortage of Home Health Care (HHC) Registered Nurses (RNs) is growing and the demand for HHC RNs is estimated to increase 109% by 2020. Factors associated with this shortage of HHC nurses include job stress/strain and low job satisfaction. Predictors of intent to leave their present HHC nursing position are not clear.  To date, no published studies have been found that apply the effort-reward imbalance (ERI) model to HHC RNs.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to measure the level of job stress/strain associated with a low job satisfaction and intent to leave reported by HHC RNs practicing in the state of Maryland.

Methods: This is a secondary analysis of the data collected from 794 HHC RNs participating in a 2006 study exploring hazard exposures in homecare. A mixed-methods analysis was conducted including quantitative and qualitative analysis.

Results:   Of the 206 HHC RNs that provided a narrative, 27.2% (n=56) reported an intent to leave or had already left their HHC positions. The six most frequent categories reported in the HHC RNs narratives included; negative organizational traits, work stress, love homecare, overwhelming paperwork, inadequate financial compensation, nurse attrition/intent to leave. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated reward as a significant predictor of good job satisfaction for all groups. Overcommitment and effort were significant predictors of low job satisfaction. Elevated ERI scores were reported for respondents with (77.2%) and without (35.0%) narratives indicating the respondents with narratives reported a higher incidence of elevated ERI scores compared to those without narratives.

Conclusions: Many HHC RNs noted improvement is needed in their work environment. Job strain/stress is evident among HHC RNs and aspects of effort, reward, and overcommitment were found to be associated with low job satisfaction but no association with intent to leave.

Keywords:
Home Health Care Registered Nurse (HHC RN); work stress; Effort Reward Imbalance
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2013
Date of Publication:
13-May-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryFull-texten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWork Stress/Strain, Low Job Satisfaction, and Intent to Leave Home Healthcare Nursing Among Home Healthcare Registered Nurses (HHC RNs)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarker, D. Paxsonen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentPien_GB
dc.author.detailsD. Paxson Barker, PhD, MS, BS, RN, paxson.barker@gmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/291006-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on Saturday, April 13, 2013</p>Background: The U.S. shortage of Home Health Care (HHC) Registered Nurses (RNs) is growing and the demand for HHC RNs is estimated to increase 109% by 2020. Factors associated with this shortage of HHC nurses include job stress/strain and low job satisfaction. Predictors of intent to leave their present HHC nursing position are not clear.&nbsp; To date, no published studies have been found that apply the effort-reward imbalance (ERI) model to HHC RNs. <p>Purpose: The purpose of this study was to measure the level of job stress/strain associated with a low job satisfaction and intent to leave reported by HHC RNs practicing in the state of Maryland. <p>Methods: This is a secondary analysis of the data collected from 794 HHC RNs participating in a 2006 study exploring hazard exposures in homecare. A mixed-methods analysis was conducted including quantitative and qualitative analysis. <p>Results:&nbsp;&nbsp; Of the 206 HHC RNs that provided a narrative, 27.2% (n=56) reported an intent to leave or had already left their HHC positions. The six most frequent categories reported in the HHC RNs narratives included; negative organizational traits, work stress, love homecare, overwhelming paperwork, inadequate financial compensation, nurse attrition/intent to leave. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated reward as a significant predictor of good job satisfaction for all groups. Overcommitment and effort were significant predictors of low job satisfaction. Elevated ERI scores were reported for respondents with (77.2%) and without (35.0%) narratives indicating the respondents with narratives reported a higher incidence of elevated ERI scores compared to those without narratives. <p>Conclusions: Many HHC RNs noted improvement is needed in their work environment. Job strain/stress is evident among HHC RNs and aspects of effort, reward, and overcommitment were found to be associated with low job satisfaction but no association with intent to leave.en_GB
dc.subjectHome Health Care Registered Nurse (HHC RN)en_GB
dc.subjectwork stressen_GB
dc.subjectEffort Reward Imbalanceen_GB
dc.date.available2013-05-13T10:26:12Z-
dc.date.issued2013-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-13T10:26:12Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environmentsen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolisen_GB
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