National Network Study of Operational Failures in Frontline Nursing: Scaling Up for Policy

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Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/291012
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
National Network Study of Operational Failures in Frontline Nursing: Scaling Up for Policy
Author(s):
Stevens, Kathleen R.; Puga, Frank; Ferrer, Robert; Patel, Darpan I.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta Alpha-at-Large
Author Details:
Kathleen R. Stevens, RN, MS, EdD; Frank Puga, PhD; Robert Ferrer, MD, MPH; Darpan I. Patel, PhD
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, April 13, 2013: Nurses are aligned to drive frontline policy in quality improvement. Yet studies often lack rigor and sample sizes large enough to be definitive. While smaller studies show that frontline operational failures occur every hour of every shift and threaten patient safety, multi-setting studies are requisite in order to craft effective microsystems interventions. Such interventions will foster learning organization climates through decreasing workarounds and making system corrections. Aims: Using a new research network for healthcare improvement, conduct a landmark national study to explain first-order operational failures in medical-surgical units in context of work environment and quality outcomes. Methods: To broaden generalizability, a local pilot study of microsystem operational failures was expanded to 52 medical-surgical units through a new national improvement research network. Network members formed a virtual research collaborative, supported by the network coordinating center and virtual laboratory. Team science principles were employed to create a common goal around a rigorous study and strong team relations. The virtual collaboratory venue provided central databases, assured fidelity of the protocol through a specialized implementation kit and site monitoring, and supported research capacity-building. Results: Within 9 months, the 14-hospital research team was formed, research protocol deployed, fidelity maintained, and 24,014 data points collected and analyzed. Results of the survey of virtual collaboration readiness were positive and team satisfaction was high. Conclusions: Research network concepts were successfully applied in a national network to investigate healthcare delivery improvement. The cyberinfrastructure, networking processes, and approaches achieved research capable of producing evidence sufficient to drive policy.
Keywords:
operational failures; frontline nursing; improvement science
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2013
Date of Publication:
13-May-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleNational Network Study of Operational Failures in Frontline Nursing: Scaling Up for Policyen
dc.contributor.authorStevens, Kathleen R.en
dc.contributor.authorPuga, Franken
dc.contributor.authorFerrer, Roberten
dc.contributor.authorPatel, Darpan I.en
dc.contributor.departmentDelta Alpha-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsKathleen R. Stevens, RN, MS, EdD; Frank Puga, PhD; Robert Ferrer, MD, MPH; Darpan I. Patel, PhDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/291012-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, April 13, 2013: Nurses are aligned to drive frontline policy in quality improvement. Yet studies often lack rigor and sample sizes large enough to be definitive. While smaller studies show that frontline operational failures occur every hour of every shift and threaten patient safety, multi-setting studies are requisite in order to craft effective microsystems interventions. Such interventions will foster learning organization climates through decreasing workarounds and making system corrections. Aims: Using a new research network for healthcare improvement, conduct a landmark national study to explain first-order operational failures in medical-surgical units in context of work environment and quality outcomes. Methods: To broaden generalizability, a local pilot study of microsystem operational failures was expanded to 52 medical-surgical units through a new national improvement research network. Network members formed a virtual research collaborative, supported by the network coordinating center and virtual laboratory. Team science principles were employed to create a common goal around a rigorous study and strong team relations. The virtual collaboratory venue provided central databases, assured fidelity of the protocol through a specialized implementation kit and site monitoring, and supported research capacity-building. Results: Within 9 months, the 14-hospital research team was formed, research protocol deployed, fidelity maintained, and 24,014 data points collected and analyzed. Results of the survey of virtual collaboration readiness were positive and team satisfaction was high. Conclusions: Research network concepts were successfully applied in a national network to investigate healthcare delivery improvement. The cyberinfrastructure, networking processes, and approaches achieved research capable of producing evidence sufficient to drive policy.en
dc.subjectoperational failuresen
dc.subjectfrontline nursingen
dc.subjectimprovement scienceen
dc.date.available2013-05-13T10:26:26Z-
dc.date.issued2013-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-13T10:26:26Z-
dc.conference.date2013en
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environmentsen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolisen
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