Workplace Bullying Experienced by African-American Nurses and Its Impact on Intent to Leave

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/291027
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Workplace Bullying Experienced by African-American Nurses and Its Impact on Intent to Leave
Author(s):
Curry, Debra L.; Cannella, Kathleen A. S.; Charles, Jennell P.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Xi Rho
Author Details:
Debra L. Curry, RN, BSN, inspiringdreamsinc@yahoo.com; Kathleen A. S. Cannella, PhD, RN; Jennell P. Charles, PhD, RN
Abstract:

Session presented on Sunday, April 14, 2013

Healthy Work Environments (HWEs) are the responsibility of all healthcare professionals.   Several factors contribute HWEs, including skilled communication and true collaboration.  Bullying as a disruptive behavior prevents true collaboration between nurses.  In the workplace, this negative behavior frequently results in nurse turnover, decreased quality of care, and increased costs to organizations.  With the current nursing shortage and with large numbers of nurses retiring in the next 15 years, it is critical that organizations find innovative ways to decrease bullying to retain nurses and contribute to the health of the environment.  Further, it is imperative to retain a diverse nurse workforce to promote access to care for all populations.   Research examining the prevalence and impact of bullying behaviors on minority nurses is lacking.  The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of bullying experienced by African-American nurses and to analyze the relationship of this negative behavior on intent to leave work positions. The theoretical framework of oppressed group behavior guided the development of the survey tool and study design.   Results from a sample of 318 African-American registered nurses active in practice indicate a 19.8% prevalence rate of bullying and a moderately strong relationship of bullying with nurses’ intent to leave the workplace.
Keywords:
bullying; African-American nurses; intent to leave
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2013
Date of Publication:
13-May-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryFull-texten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWorkplace Bullying Experienced by African-American Nurses and Its Impact on Intent to Leaveen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCurry, Debra L.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorCannella, Kathleen A. S.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorCharles, Jennell P.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentXi Rhoen_GB
dc.author.detailsDebra L. Curry, RN, BSN, inspiringdreamsinc@yahoo.com; Kathleen A. S. Cannella, PhD, RN; Jennell P. Charles, PhD, RNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/291027-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on Sunday, April 14, 2013</p>Healthy Work Environments (HWEs) are the responsibility of all healthcare professionals.&nbsp;&nbsp; Several factors contribute HWEs, including skilled communication and true collaboration.&nbsp; Bullying as a disruptive behavior prevents true collaboration between nurses. &nbsp;In the workplace, this negative behavior frequently results in nurse turnover, decreased quality of care, and increased costs to organizations.&nbsp; With the current nursing shortage and with large numbers of nurses retiring in the next 15 years, it is critical that organizations find innovative ways to decrease bullying to retain nurses and contribute to the health of the environment.&nbsp; Further, it is imperative to retain a diverse nurse workforce to promote access to care for all populations.&nbsp;&nbsp; Research examining the prevalence and impact of bullying behaviors on minority nurses is lacking. &nbsp;The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of bullying experienced by African-American nurses and to analyze the relationship of this negative behavior on intent to leave work positions. The theoretical framework of oppressed group behavior guided the development of the survey tool and study design.&nbsp;&nbsp; Results from a sample of 318 African-American registered nurses active in practice indicate a 19.8% prevalence rate of bullying and a moderately strong relationship of bullying with nurses&rsquo; intent to leave the workplace.en_GB
dc.subjectbullyingen_GB
dc.subjectAfrican-American nursesen_GB
dc.subjectintent to leaveen_GB
dc.date.available2013-05-13T10:27:02Z-
dc.date.issued2013-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-13T10:27:02Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environmentsen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolisen_GB
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