Workplace Violence: Actual and Feared Events in a Southeast Medical Center

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/291032
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Workplace Violence: Actual and Feared Events in a Southeast Medical Center
Other Titles:
Clinical Session: Building a Safe Work Environment
Author(s):
Forehand, Jeffery Wade; Spurlock, Amy L.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Iota Theta
Author Details:
Jeffery Wade Forehand, MSN, RN-BC; Amy L. Spurlock, RN, PhD
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, April 13, 2013: Healthcare associated work place violence (WPV) remains an ever increasing danger to the nursing workforce. Healthcare workers are much more likely to be injured on the job than other professions with nurses at the highest risk of injury. In a recent year, registered nurses reported over 2,000 assaults and violent acts resulted in an average of 4 days lost from work. Outcomes impacted by WPV include patient care, medication errors, job satisfaction and retention and physical/mental health. The purpose of phase one of this study was to assess current workplace violence in a southeast medical center with an anticipated need for an educational/behavioral intervention to impact WPV. Workplace violence began to be tracked as a targeted interest of employee health in January 2011 resulting in a perceived under-reporting of violent events. In an academic-clinical partnership with a university school of nursing, a phase one research project was designed to establish baseline knowledge of actual and feared violent events at work. The investigators surveyed 53 medical center employees with the Violent Events at Work and Fear of Future Violent Events a Work surveys, tools with established test-retest reliability (r(34)) =.92, p> .01). Items on both tools were significantly different by unit worked, including actual and feared physical violent events of hitting and kicking (p > .05) and spitting and biting (p > .05). Fear of future violent events was significantly different by unit worked (X2 (35) = 56.634, p > .05). Of the seven employees who reported fear of future violent events at work, five (71.4%) were from the ER or Behavioral unit. The basis of this research project lay the groundwork for future interventional research aimed at decreasing workplace violence within the healthcare setting.
Keywords:
workplace violence; academic-clinical collaboration
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2013
Date of Publication:
13-May-2013
Other Identifiers:
CHWE13CB03
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleWorkplace Violence: Actual and Feared Events in a Southeast Medical Centeren
dc.title.alternativeClinical Session: Building a Safe Work Environmenten
dc.contributor.authorForehand, Jeffery Wadeen
dc.contributor.authorSpurlock, Amy L.en
dc.contributor.departmentIota Thetaen
dc.author.detailsJeffery Wade Forehand, MSN, RN-BC; Amy L. Spurlock, RN, PhDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/291032-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, April 13, 2013: Healthcare associated work place violence (WPV) remains an ever increasing danger to the nursing workforce. Healthcare workers are much more likely to be injured on the job than other professions with nurses at the highest risk of injury. In a recent year, registered nurses reported over 2,000 assaults and violent acts resulted in an average of 4 days lost from work. Outcomes impacted by WPV include patient care, medication errors, job satisfaction and retention and physical/mental health. The purpose of phase one of this study was to assess current workplace violence in a southeast medical center with an anticipated need for an educational/behavioral intervention to impact WPV. Workplace violence began to be tracked as a targeted interest of employee health in January 2011 resulting in a perceived under-reporting of violent events. In an academic-clinical partnership with a university school of nursing, a phase one research project was designed to establish baseline knowledge of actual and feared violent events at work. The investigators surveyed 53 medical center employees with the Violent Events at Work and Fear of Future Violent Events a Work surveys, tools with established test-retest reliability (r(34)) =.92, p> .01). Items on both tools were significantly different by unit worked, including actual and feared physical violent events of hitting and kicking (p > .05) and spitting and biting (p > .05). Fear of future violent events was significantly different by unit worked (X2 (35) = 56.634, p > .05). Of the seven employees who reported fear of future violent events at work, five (71.4%) were from the ER or Behavioral unit. The basis of this research project lay the groundwork for future interventional research aimed at decreasing workplace violence within the healthcare setting.en
dc.subjectworkplace violenceen
dc.subjectacademic-clinical collaborationen
dc.date.available2013-05-13T10:27:11Z-
dc.date.issued2013-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-13T10:27:11Z-
dc.conference.date2013en
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environmentsen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolisen
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