Antecedents and Consequences of New Graduate Nurses' Experiences of Workplace Mistreatment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/291033
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Antecedents and Consequences of New Graduate Nurses' Experiences of Workplace Mistreatment
Author(s):
Read, Emily Alicia; Laschinger, Heather K. S.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Iota Omicron
Author Details:
Emily Alicia Read, RN, BScN, MSc, eread2@uwo.ca; Heather K. S. Laschinger, RN, PhD
Abstract:

Session presented on Saturday, April 13, 2013

Background and Purpose: Given the impending nursing shortage and high turnover intentions of nurses within the first two years of practice, recent reports of workplace mistreatment targeting new graduate nurses are unsettling. Coworker and supervisor incivility and bullying negatively influence nurses’ work and health however it is unclear whether these forms of workplace mistreatment have similar precipitating factors and outcomes. This study examines an exploratory model of antecedents and outcomes of three forms of workplace mistreatment. Methods: Secondary data analysis was performed on data from a larger study of new graduate’s worklife.  From a random sample of 709 registered nurses newly registered with the College of Nurses of Ontario (CNO) within the last two years, 342 nurses responded (48% response rate).  Participants were asked to complete a study questionnaire which was mailed to their home address between July and October of 2010. The study was approved by the research ethics board at Western University. Findings: Workplace incivility and bullying had similar antecedents including empowerment, a sense of community, authentic leadership, and psychological capital. All three forms of workplace mistreatment were significantly related to all outcomes except personal job efficacy. Bullying had stronger correlations than incivility to all significant outcome variables. Conclusions: New graduate nurses’ experiences of these three types of workplace mistreatment have similar precipitating factors and outcomes although bullying appears to have stronger negative effects. Our results suggest that authentic leadership and empowering work environments that foster the personal growth of new graduate nurses may be promising strategies for preventing and reducing workplace mistreatment targeting new graduate nurses, thereby contributing to the sustainability of the nursing workforce.
Keywords:
incivility; new graduate nurses; leadership
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2013
Date of Publication:
13-May-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryFull-texten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAntecedents and Consequences of New Graduate Nurses' Experiences of Workplace Mistreatmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorRead, Emily Aliciaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLaschinger, Heather K. S.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentIota Omicronen_GB
dc.author.detailsEmily Alicia Read, RN, BScN, MSc, eread2@uwo.ca; Heather K. S. Laschinger, RN, PhDen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/291033-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on Saturday, April 13, 2013</p><b>Background and Purpose</b>: Given the impending nursing shortage and high turnover intentions of nurses within the first two years of practice, recent reports of workplace mistreatment targeting new graduate nurses are unsettling. Coworker and supervisor incivility and bullying negatively influence nurses&rsquo; work and health however it is unclear whether these forms of workplace mistreatment have similar precipitating factors and outcomes. This study examines an exploratory model of antecedents and outcomes of three forms of workplace mistreatment. <b>Methods: </b>Secondary data analysis was performed on data from a larger study of new graduate&rsquo;s worklife.&nbsp; From a random sample of 709 registered nurses newly registered with the College of Nurses of Ontario (CNO) within the last two years, 342 nurses responded (48% response rate).&nbsp; Participants were asked to complete a study questionnaire which was mailed to their home address between July and October of 2010. The study was approved by the research ethics board at Western University. <b>Findings: </b>Workplace incivility and bullying had similar antecedents including empowerment, a sense of community, authentic leadership, and psychological capital. All three forms of workplace mistreatment were significantly related to all outcomes except personal job efficacy. Bullying had stronger correlations than incivility to all significant outcome variables. <b>Conclusions:</b> New graduate nurses&rsquo; experiences of these three types of workplace mistreatment have similar precipitating factors and outcomes although bullying appears to have stronger negative effects. Our results suggest that authentic leadership and empowering work environments that foster the personal growth of new graduate nurses may be promising strategies for preventing and reducing workplace mistreatment targeting new graduate nurses, thereby contributing to the sustainability of the nursing workforce.en_GB
dc.subjectincivilityen_GB
dc.subjectnew graduate nursesen_GB
dc.subjectleadershipen_GB
dc.date.available2013-05-13T10:27:13Z-
dc.date.issued2013-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-13T10:27:13Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environmentsen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolisen_GB
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