Perceptions Regarding the Effect of Doctoral Teaching on Faculty Ability to Maintain a Program of Scholarship

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/291034
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceptions Regarding the Effect of Doctoral Teaching on Faculty Ability to Maintain a Program of Scholarship
Author(s):
Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C.; Wise, Nancy J.; Smeltzer, Suzanne C.; Cantrell, Mary Ann; Heverly, Mary Ann; Jenkinson, Amanda
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Nu
Author Details:
Nancy C. Sharts-Hopko, PhD, RN, FAAN, nancy.sharts-hopko@villanova.edu; Nancy J. Wise, MSN, RN; Suzanne C. Smeltzer, EdD, RN, MS, FAAN; Mary Ann Cantrell, PhD, RN; Amanda Jenkinson, MSN, RN; Mary Ann Heverly, PhD
Abstract:

Session presented on Saturday, April 13, 2013

Purpose:  The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify perceptions among faculty members teaching in DNP and PhD programs about the effects of their involvement in doctoral education, barriers and facilitators to scholarly productivity, and faculty characteristics related to success in maintaining an ongoing program of scholarship .

Framework:  The significance of this study was supported by findings of the IOM report on The Future of Nursing that recommends doubling the number of doctorally prepared nurses by 2020.

Methods:   Participants participated in two focus groups, one conducted at a national research conference (N=13) and one conducted at a conference for DNP faculty (N=17) in the fall of 2012. Data were recorded, transcribed, and content analyzed. 

Findings: Demographic data from 24 participants indicated that 95% teach full-time.  A majority (43.5%) are age 51-60 and none were under the age of 41.  Nearly 48% had a PhD degree while 43.5% have a DNP degree, and nearly 46% teach in a PhD program, while over 75% teach in a DNP program.

Themes that emerged from content analysis of the focus groups included the demands of teaching,  including the quantity and nature of “invisible” work, and faster rhythms of academic life in recent years;  the importance of institutional  structure and climate, which includes subthemes of the  mission of the school, expectations related to boundary-setting, and roles of junior versus senior faculty; and self, institutional, and disciplinary sustainability, which includes the personal costs to faculty of teaching doctoral students, issues related to work-life balance, characteristics of unsuccessful faculty, characteristics and strategies related to success, and issues related to scholarship and stewardship of the discipline.

Conclusions and implications:  Characteristics of successful faculty members were identified.  The findings indicate that workload expectations for doctoral nursing faculty have implications for recruitment and retention of doctoral faculty.

Keywords:
Invisible work; Doctoral education; Scholarly productivity
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2013
Date of Publication:
13-May-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryFull-texten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceptions Regarding the Effect of Doctoral Teaching on Faculty Ability to Maintain a Program of Scholarshipen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSharts-Hopko, Nancy C.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorWise, Nancy J.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorSmeltzer, Suzanne C.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorCantrell, Mary Annen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHeverly, Mary Annen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJenkinson, Amandaen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Nuen_GB
dc.author.detailsNancy C. Sharts-Hopko, PhD, RN, FAAN, nancy.sharts-hopko@villanova.edu; Nancy J. Wise, MSN, RN; Suzanne C. Smeltzer, EdD, RN, MS, FAAN; Mary Ann Cantrell, PhD, RN; Amanda Jenkinson, MSN, RN; Mary Ann Heverly, PhDen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/291034-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on Saturday, April 13, 2013</p>Purpose:&nbsp; The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify perceptions among faculty members teaching in DNP and PhD programs about the effects of their involvement in doctoral education, barriers and facilitators to scholarly productivity, and faculty characteristics related to success in maintaining an ongoing program of scholarship . <p>Framework:&nbsp; The significance of this study was supported by findings of the IOM report on <i>The Future of Nursing </i>that recommends doubling the number of doctorally prepared nurses by 2020. <p>Methods:&nbsp;&nbsp; Participants participated in two focus groups, one conducted at a national research conference (N=13) and one conducted at a conference for DNP faculty (N=17) in the fall of 2012. Data were recorded, transcribed, and content analyzed.&nbsp; <p>Findings: Demographic data from 24 participants indicated that 95% teach full-time.&nbsp; A majority (43.5%) are age 51-60 and none were under the age of 41.&nbsp; Nearly 48% had a PhD degree while 43.5% have a DNP degree, and nearly 46% teach in a PhD program, while over 75% teach in a DNP program. <p>Themes that emerged from content analysis of the focus groups included the demands of teaching,&nbsp; including the quantity and nature of &ldquo;invisible&rdquo; work, and faster rhythms of academic life in recent years;&nbsp; the importance of institutional&nbsp; structure and climate, which includes subthemes of the&nbsp; mission of the school, expectations related to boundary-setting, and roles of junior versus senior faculty; and self, institutional, and disciplinary sustainability, which includes the personal costs to faculty of teaching doctoral students, issues related to work-life balance, characteristics of unsuccessful faculty, characteristics and strategies related to success, and issues related to scholarship and stewardship of the discipline. <p>Conclusions and implications:&nbsp; Characteristics of successful faculty members were identified.&nbsp; The findings indicate that workload expectations for doctoral nursing faculty have implications for recruitment and retention of doctoral faculty.en_GB
dc.subjectInvisible worken_GB
dc.subjectDoctoral educationen_GB
dc.subjectScholarly productivityen_GB
dc.date.available2013-05-13T10:27:15Z-
dc.date.issued2013-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-13T10:27:15Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environmentsen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolisen_GB
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