The Lived Experience of Tuberculosis Treatment for Mexican Americans Living on the US-Mexico Border

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/293320
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Research Study
Title:
The Lived Experience of Tuberculosis Treatment for Mexican Americans Living on the US-Mexico Border
Author(s):
Zuniga, Julie
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Epsilon Sigma
Author Details:
Julie Ann Zuniga, PhD, RN, email: julie.zuniga@emory.edu
Abstract:

This study produced a rich description of the lived experiences of tuberculosis (TB) treatment among Mexican Americans with TB living in the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) of Texas. This phenomenological study was guided by Merleau-Ponty’s philosophical framework, particularly his theories on mind-body influence, fabric of relationships, importance of culture, and equilibrium. A purposeful sample was recruited through TB clinics in four south Texas border counties: Hidalgo, Cameron, Starr, and Willacy, which make up the LRGV.  Interviews from 18 participants were conducted in the participants’ preferred language and analyzed.  There were five women and 13 men.  The majority of interviews (n=16) were conducted in Spanish.  Five themes were discovered: a) being observed taking pills everyday b) signs and symptoms, c) importance of family, d) stigma; and e) border living. Stigma has four subconcepts: masks, interactions with others, internalization of stigma, and actions to limit exposure to stigma.  The overarching theme was a struggle to find a balance during treatment between being exposed to stigma and isolation from social support. Recommendations have been made in regard to education, practice, and research, and health policy.

Keywords:
Tuberculosis; Mexican Americans
Repository Posting Date:
3-Jun-2013
Date of Publication:
3-Jun-2013
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Note:
The Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.; This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryAbstracten
dc.typeResearch Studyen
dc.titleThe Lived Experience of Tuberculosis Treatment for Mexican Americans Living on the US-Mexico Borderen_US
dc.contributor.authorZuniga, Julie-
dc.contributor.departmentEpsilon Sigmaen
dc.author.detailsJulie Ann Zuniga, PhD, RN, email: julie.zuniga@emory.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/293320-
dc.description.abstract<p>This study produced a rich description of the lived experiences of tuberculosis (TB) treatment among Mexican Americans with TB living in the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) of Texas. This phenomenological study was guided by Merleau-Ponty’s philosophical framework, particularly his theories on mind-body influence, fabric of relationships, importance of culture, and equilibrium. A purposeful sample was recruited through TB clinics in four south Texas border counties: Hidalgo, Cameron, Starr, and Willacy, which make up the LRGV.  Interviews from 18 participants were conducted in the participants’ preferred language and analyzed.  There were five women and 13 men.  The majority of interviews (n=16) were conducted in Spanish.  Five themes were discovered: a) being observed taking pills everyday b) signs and symptoms, c) importance of family, d) stigma; and e) border living. Stigma has four subconcepts: masks, interactions with others, internalization of stigma, and actions to limit exposure to stigma.  The overarching theme was a struggle to find a balance during treatment between being exposed to stigma and isolation from social support. Recommendations have been made in regard to education, practice, and research, and health policy.</p>en_GB
dc.subjectTuberculosisen_GB
dc.subjectMexican Americansen_GB
dc.date.available2013-06-03T16:20:50Z-
dc.date.issued2013-06-03-
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-03T16:20:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.description.noteThe Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.en
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item.-
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