Patient Perceptions of Patient-Empowering Nurse Behaviors, Patient Activation, and Functional Health Status After Surgery

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/297908
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Research Study
Level of Evidence:
Other
Research Approach:
Quantitative Research
Title:
Patient Perceptions of Patient-Empowering Nurse Behaviors, Patient Activation, and Functional Health Status After Surgery
Author(s):
Jerofke, Teresa
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta Gamma-at-Large
Author Details:
Teresa Jerofke, PhD, RN, APNP-BC, teresa.jerofke@marquette.edu
Abstract:

Patient empowerment has been advocated as a way to engage patients in self-management of chronic illnesses in emerging patient-centered models for healthcare improvement.  The majority of research on patient empowerment has studied empowerment as an outcome in outpatient settings, with little attention to provider processes used to empower patients during a hospitalization.  Post-operative patients with life-threatening chronic illnesses face multiple illness-related transitions associated with the recovery from their surgery and taking on the role of managing their life-threatening chronic illnesses upon hospital discharge.

A correlational, longitudinal design framed by Meleis’ Transitions Theory and the Individual and Family Self-Management Theory (IFSMT) was used to determine the relationship between patient perceptions of patient-empowering nurse behaviors in an acute care setting and patient activation and functional health status six-weeks post-discharge in patients who recently underwent a surgical procedure for cancer or cardiac disease.  In addition, tests of validity and reliability were conducted on a newly constructed instrument, the Patient Perceptions of Patient-Empowering Nurse Behaviors Scale (PPPNBS). 

One hundred thirteen post-surgical cancer and cardiac patients participated.  Patient perceptions of patient-empowering nurse behaviors and baseline patient activation were measured prior to discharge with the PPPNBS and 13-item Patient Activation Measure (PAM 13).  Patient activation and functional health status were measured six-weeks following discharge with the PAM 13 and SF-36.  Multiple linear regression using a simultaneous equation approach was used to identify significant relationships. Patient perceptions of patient-empowering nurse behaviors were significantly positively associated with post-discharge patient activation, which was significantly positively associated with mental functional health status.  Length of stay was the only significant predictor of physical functional health status.  The PPPNBS demonstrated acceptable validity and reliability in post-surgical patients with a life-threatening chronic illness.

 Patient-empowering nurse behaviors can be used to facilitate engagement in self-management behavior, improve functional health status, and should be examined as a way to improve the cost of chronic illness care through improved patient activation levels.  Transitions Theory and the IFSMT provided a useful framework to examine the contribution of nursing care, represented by patient-empowering nurse behaviors, to patient self-management outcomes. 

Keywords:
Empowerment; patient engagement; patient-centered care; self-management; functional health; transitions; surgical nursing; patient activation
MeSH:
Nurse-Patient Relations; Perioperative Nursing
Repository Posting Date:
12-Aug-2013
Date of Publication:
12-Aug-2013
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Note:
The Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.; This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryAbstracten
dc.typeResearch Studyen
dc.evidence.levelOtheren
dc.research.approachQuantitative Researchen
dc.titlePatient Perceptions of Patient-Empowering Nurse Behaviors, Patient Activation, and Functional Health Status After Surgeryen_US
dc.contributor.authorJerofke, Teresa-
dc.contributor.departmentDelta Gamma-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsTeresa Jerofke, PhD, RN, APNP-BC, teresa.jerofke@marquette.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/297908-
dc.description.abstract<p>Patient empowerment has been advocated as a way to engage patients in self-management of chronic illnesses in emerging patient-centered models for healthcare improvement.  The majority of research on patient empowerment has studied empowerment as an outcome in outpatient settings, with little attention to provider processes used to empower patients during a hospitalization.  Post-operative patients with life-threatening chronic illnesses face multiple illness-related transitions associated with the recovery from their surgery and taking on the role of managing their life-threatening chronic illnesses upon hospital discharge.<strong></strong></p> <p>A correlational, longitudinal design framed by Meleis’ Transitions Theory and the Individual and Family Self-Management Theory (IFSMT) was used to determine the relationship between patient perceptions of patient-empowering nurse behaviors in an acute care setting and patient activation and functional health status six-weeks post-discharge in patients who recently underwent a surgical procedure for cancer or cardiac disease.  In addition, tests of validity and reliability were conducted on a newly constructed instrument, the Patient Perceptions of Patient-Empowering Nurse Behaviors Scale (PPPNBS). </p> <p>One hundred thirteen post-surgical cancer and cardiac patients participated.  Patient perceptions of patient-empowering nurse behaviors and baseline patient activation were measured prior to discharge with the PPPNBS and 13-item Patient Activation Measure (PAM 13).  Patient activation and functional health status were measured six-weeks following discharge with the PAM 13 and SF-36.  Multiple linear regression using a simultaneous equation approach was used to identify significant relationships. Patient perceptions of patient-empowering nurse behaviors were significantly positively associated with post-discharge patient activation, which was significantly positively associated with mental functional health status.  Length of stay was the only significant predictor of physical functional health status.  The PPPNBS demonstrated acceptable validity and reliability in post-surgical patients with a life-threatening chronic illness.</p> <p> Patient-empowering nurse behaviors can be used to facilitate engagement in self-management behavior, improve functional health status, and should be examined as a way to improve the cost of chronic illness care through improved patient activation levels.  Transitions Theory and the IFSMT provided a useful framework to examine the contribution of nursing care, represented by patient-empowering nurse behaviors, to patient self-management outcomes.  <strong></strong></p>en_GB
dc.subjectEmpowermenten_GB
dc.subjectpatient engagementen_GB
dc.subjectpatient-centered careen_GB
dc.subjectself-managementen_GB
dc.subjectfunctional healthen_GB
dc.subjecttransitionsen_GB
dc.subjectsurgical nursingen_GB
dc.subjectpatient activationen_GB
dc.subject.meshNurse-Patient Relationsen_US
dc.subject.meshPerioperative Nursingen_US
dc.date.available2013-08-12T14:09:24Z-
dc.date.issued2013-08-12-
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-12T14:09:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.description.noteThe Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.en
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item.-
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