7.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/299522
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Dissertation
Level of Evidence:
Other
Research Approach:
Quantitative Research
Title:
Discovering the Current Wound Management Practices of Rural Africans
Author(s):
Benskin, Linda L. L.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Delta
Author Details:
Linda LL Benskin, PhD, RN, SRN (Ghana) CWCN, CWS, DAPWCA; email: lindabenskin@utexas.edu
Abstract:

Unrelenting heat, poor sanitation, lack of knowledge, and poverty contribute to a disabling wound prevalence that often exceeds 20% in rural areas of tropical developing countries. Wounds in this environment are usually poorly managed at very high cost. Traditional health practitioners and village health workers, rather than health professionals, provide health care in most villages. Wound management education for these nonprofessional health providers should include only sustainable practices which prove to be safe and effective in tropical villages. However, usual practice data, needed for comparison studies, is absent from the published literature.

This pilot study introduced an innovative data collection method to overcome cultural obstacles which have prevented researchers from obtaining meaningful quantitative data in this challenging setting. Between August and October of 2012, seventy-five participants from 25 diverse villages in Ghana provided detailed descriptions of their current usual topical wound management methods by completing the stories of patients representing each of seven wound types commonly found in this setting. Responses were tabulated and categorized as congruent or not congruent with modern topical wound management principles within three domains and six subcategories (two for each domain). Four research questions organized the data analysis.

The wound management practices of nonprofessional health care providers were identified and described in detail for the first time. These results are foundational to the process of developing culturally and environmentally appropriate wound management protocols for indigenous wound care providers in rural areas of tropical developing countries. In addition, several significant differences in the wound management of the three nonprofessional provider groups were found.

The unique data collection method introduced in this study can easily be adapted to rural areas of other tropical developing countries. When sufficient data have been accumulated, the information can be utilized to design comparison studies so that the ecological validity of the wound management protocols in planned educational programs can be ensured.

Keywords:
africa; Wound Healing; village health workers; Developing Countries; tropical disease; Rural Health; Ghana; wound management
MeSH:
Wound healing; Rural Health--Africa, Western
Repository Posting Date:
22-Aug-2013
Date of Publication:
May-2013
Version of Published Work:
Post-print
Citation:
Benskin, L. (2013). Discovering the current wound management practices of rural Africans. https://repositories.tdl.org/utmb-ir/handle/2152.3/538
Publisher:
UTMB Repository (The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston)
Sponsors:
Interested individuals sponsored this research
Note:
This work has been approved through a peer-review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typeDissertationen
dc.evidence.levelOtheren
dc.research.approachQuantitative Researchen
dc.titleDiscovering the Current Wound Management Practices of Rural Africansen_US
dc.contributor.authorBenskin, Linda L. L.-
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Deltaen
dc.author.detailsLinda LL Benskin, PhD, RN, SRN (Ghana) CWCN, CWS, DAPWCA; email: lindabenskin@utexas.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152.3/538-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/299522-
dc.description.abstract<p>Unrelenting heat, poor sanitation, lack of knowledge, and poverty contribute to a disabling wound prevalence that often exceeds 20% in rural areas of tropical developing countries. Wounds in this environment are usually poorly managed at very high cost. Traditional health practitioners and village health workers, rather than health professionals, provide health care in most villages. Wound management education for these nonprofessional health providers should include only sustainable practices which prove to be safe and effective in tropical villages. However, usual practice data, needed for comparison studies, is absent from the published literature.</p> <p>This pilot study introduced an innovative data collection method to overcome cultural obstacles which have prevented researchers from obtaining meaningful quantitative data in this challenging setting. Between August and October of 2012, seventy-five participants from 25 diverse villages in Ghana provided detailed descriptions of their current usual topical wound management methods by completing the stories of patients representing each of seven wound types commonly found in this setting. Responses were tabulated and categorized as congruent or not congruent with modern topical wound management principles within three domains and six subcategories (two for each domain). Four research questions organized the data analysis.</p> <p>The wound management practices of nonprofessional health care providers were identified and described in detail for the first time. These results are foundational to the process of developing culturally and environmentally appropriate wound management protocols for indigenous wound care providers in rural areas of tropical developing countries. In addition, several significant differences in the wound management of the three nonprofessional provider groups were found.</p> <p>The unique data collection method introduced in this study can easily be adapted to rural areas of other tropical developing countries. When sufficient data have been accumulated, the information can be utilized to design comparison studies so that the ecological validity of the wound management protocols in planned educational programs can be ensured.</p>en_GB
dc.subjectafricaen_GB
dc.subjectWound Healingen_GB
dc.subjectvillage health workersen_GB
dc.subjectDeveloping Countriesen_GB
dc.subjecttropical diseaseen_GB
dc.subjectRural Healthen_GB
dc.subjectGhanaen_GB
dc.subjectwound managementen_GB
dc.subject.meshWound healingen_US
dc.subject.meshRural Health--Africa, Westernen
dc.date.available2013-08-22T14:00:20Z-
dc.date.issued2013-05-
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-22T14:00:20Z-
dc.type.versionPost-printen
dc.identifier.citationBenskin, L. (2013). Discovering the current wound management practices of rural Africans. https://repositories.tdl.org/utmb-ir/handle/2152.3/538en_GB
dc.publisherUTMB Repository (The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston)en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipInterested individuals sponsored this researchen_GB
dc.identifier.citationBenskin, L. (2013). Discovering the current wound management practices of rural Africans. https://repositories.tdl.org/utmb-ir/handle/2152.3/538en_GB
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a peer-review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.-
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