2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/301562
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Research Study
Level of Evidence:
Qualitative Study, Grounded Theory
Research Approach:
Qualitative Research
Title:
Exercise Perceptions of Hispanic Children with Asthma
Author(s):
Shaw, Michele; Oneal, Gail
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta Chi-at-Large
Author Details:
Michele R. Shaw RN, PhD | Assistant Professor Washington State University College of Nursing P.O. Box 1495 | Room 341 | Spokane, WA 99210-1495 ph 509-324-7282 | c 509-951-7066 | michele_shaw@wsu.edu nursing.wsu.edu; Gail Oneal, PhD, RN Washington State University College of Nursing P.O. Box 1495 Spokane, WA 99210-1495 Room 345 ph 509-324-7263| c 509-935-7983 | f 509-324-7341 goneal@wsu.edu nursing.wsu.edu
Abstract:

Introduction: Asthma is the most common chronic condition among children, currently effecting 9.6% of all U.S. children. The Burden of Asthma is particularly heavy among Hispanic children who face barriers leading to inadequate diagnosis and treatment of the disease. Poverty, lack of access to quality healthcare, language/cultural barriers, environmental factors, and genetic influences, are just a few of the factors impacting the management and severity of asthma among Hispanic children. Asthma prevalence among Hispanics varies from 3.4%- 16%.

Hispanic children are more likely to receive less treatment for their asthma, often leading to frequent hospital visits, causing stress and financial burdens for both families and health care institutions. Hispanic children have the highest rates of overweight and obesity (43%) and this population participates less in physical activity when compared to Non-Hispanic Caucasian classmates. This is a significant clinical and social problem because involvement in exercise plays a health promoting role among children with asthma by decreasing symptom severity and improving quality of life.

Aims/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explicate predominant concepts involved with exercise perceptions among Hispanic children (ages 8-14 years old) with asthma, and to describe potential relationships among the concepts in order to further develop an explanatory theory to guide development of effective nursing interventions and to drive future research. Aims included, 1) testing the previously developed grounded theory: “the process of creating perceptions of exercise”, by explicating predominant concepts in exercise perceptions among an ethnically diverse population of Hispanic children with asthma in order to broaden previous findings and 2) to develop a new and/or modified explanatory grounded theory relevant to exercise perceptions of Hispanic children with asthma.

Theoretical Framework: The study was guided by the grounded theory: “the process of creating perceptions of exercise” (Shaw & Davis, 2011). This process includes several influencing factors involved in the ongoing creation of perceptions of exercise. Exercise perceptions can be described as the values, beliefs, and thoughts the participants form towards exercise. Exercise perceptions may be created as a negative or positive outcome of the process dependent upon the various influencers involved in the life of the school aged child with asthma.

Research Design: Grounded theory (GT) was used as the methodological approach for the study. GT illuminated important components of exercise perceptions directly from the participants. Study participants included Hispanic children, ages 8-14 years old, with asthma and their families. Professionals who work closely with Hispanic children with asthma were also interviewed as the study progressed. Fifteen participants were interviewed utilizing a semi-structured interview guide. As the children, families, and professionals shared their unique experiences through the interview process, predominate concepts began to emerge. Theory was then developed through iterative analysis.

Results/Discussion: The findings from this study supported the previously identified grounded theory, “the process of creating perceptions of exercise.” The addition of input by Hispanic children with asthma further credited the four predominant categories including: perceived benefits, striving for normalcy, exercise influences, and asthma’s influence. The data clearly supported all previously identified categories and concepts. Parental influence on exercise behaviors was strongly supported throughout analysis. Although no new categories or concepts emerged from this study, the influence of parents was extremely evident among this population and should be considered when developing or revising interventions.

Although asthma has no current cure, if treated appropriately, the disease can be well controlled. National asthma treatment guidelines include the prescription of exercise for children with asthma. This study adds the unique perspectives of Hispanic children with asthma to the previously identified grounded theory, “the process of creating perceptions of exercise.” The theory can be utilized to assist in the development of nursing interventions aimed at increasing exercise participation among Hispanic children with asthma.

Keywords:
Asthma; Exercise; Children; Perceptions; Hispanics; Grounded theory
Repository Posting Date:
13-Sep-2013
Date of Publication:
13-Sep-2013
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Note:
The Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.; This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryAbstracten
dc.typeResearch Studyen
dc.evidence.levelQualitative Study, Grounded Theoryen
dc.research.approachQualitative Researchen
dc.titleExercise Perceptions of Hispanic Children with Asthmaen_US
dc.contributor.authorShaw, Michele-
dc.contributor.authorOneal, Gail-
dc.contributor.departmentDelta Chi-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsMichele R. Shaw RN, PhD | Assistant Professor Washington State University College of Nursing P.O. Box 1495 | Room 341 | Spokane, WA 99210-1495 ph 509-324-7282 | c 509-951-7066 | michele_shaw@wsu.edu nursing.wsu.edu; Gail Oneal, PhD, RN Washington State University College of Nursing P.O. Box 1495 Spokane, WA 99210-1495 Room 345 ph 509-324-7263| c 509-935-7983 | f 509-324-7341 goneal@wsu.edu nursing.wsu.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/301562-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Introduction: </strong>Asthma is the most common chronic condition among children, currently effecting 9.6% of all U.S. children. The Burden of Asthma is particularly heavy among Hispanic children who face barriers leading to inadequate diagnosis and treatment of the disease. Poverty, lack of access to quality healthcare, language/cultural barriers, environmental factors, and genetic influences, are just a few of the factors impacting the management and severity of asthma among Hispanic children. Asthma prevalence among Hispanics varies from 3.4%- 16%. <strong></strong></p> <p>Hispanic children are more likely to receive less treatment for their asthma, often leading to frequent hospital visits, causing stress and financial burdens for both families and health care institutions. Hispanic children have the highest rates of overweight and obesity (43%) and this population participates less in physical activity when compared to Non-Hispanic Caucasian classmates. This is a significant clinical and social problem because involvement in exercise plays a health promoting role among children with asthma by decreasing symptom severity and improving quality of life.</p> <p><strong>Aims/Objectives: </strong>The purpose of this study was to explicate predominant concepts involved with exercise perceptions among Hispanic children (ages 8-14 years old) with asthma, and to describe potential relationships among the concepts in order to further develop an explanatory theory to guide development of effective nursing interventions and to drive future research. Aims included, 1) testing the previously developed grounded theory: “the process of creating perceptions of exercise”, by explicating predominant concepts in exercise perceptions among an ethnically diverse population of Hispanic children with asthma in order to broaden previous findings and 2) to develop a new and/or modified explanatory grounded theory relevant to exercise perceptions of Hispanic children with asthma.</p> <p><strong>Theoretical Framework: </strong>The study was guided by the grounded theory: “the process of creating perceptions of exercise” (Shaw & Davis, 2011). This process includes several influencing factors involved in the ongoing creation of perceptions of exercise. Exercise perceptions can be described as the values, beliefs, and thoughts the participants form towards exercise. Exercise perceptions may be created as a negative or positive outcome of the process dependent upon the various influencers involved in the life of the school aged child with asthma.</p> <p><strong>Research Design: </strong>Grounded theory (GT) was used as the methodological approach for the study. GT illuminated important components of exercise perceptions directly from the participants. Study participants included Hispanic children, ages 8-14 years old, with asthma and their families. Professionals who work closely with Hispanic children with asthma were also interviewed as the study progressed. Fifteen participants were interviewed utilizing a semi-structured interview guide. As the children, families, and professionals shared their unique experiences through the interview process, predominate concepts began to emerge. Theory was then developed through iterative analysis.</p> <p><strong>Results/Discussion: </strong>The findings from this study supported the previously identified grounded theory, “the process of creating perceptions of exercise.” The addition of input by Hispanic children with asthma further credited the four predominant categories including: <em>perceived benefits</em>, <em>striving for normalcy</em>, <em>exercise influences</em>, and <em>asthma’s influence</em>. The data clearly supported all previously identified categories and concepts. Parental influence on exercise behaviors was strongly supported throughout analysis. Although no new categories or concepts emerged from this study, the influence of parents was extremely evident among this population and should be considered when developing or revising interventions.<strong> </strong></p> <p>Although asthma has no current cure, if treated appropriately, the disease can be well controlled. National asthma treatment guidelines include the prescription of exercise for children with asthma. This study adds the unique perspectives of Hispanic children with asthma to the previously identified grounded theory, “the process of creating perceptions of exercise.” The theory can be utilized to assist in the development of nursing interventions aimed at increasing exercise participation among Hispanic children with asthma.</p>en_GB
dc.subjectAsthmaen_GB
dc.subjectExerciseen_GB
dc.subjectChildrenen_GB
dc.subjectPerceptionsen_GB
dc.subjectHispanicsen_GB
dc.subjectGrounded theoryen_GB
dc.date.available2013-09-13T18:16:38Z-
dc.date.issued2013-09-13-
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-13T18:16:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.description.noteThe Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.en
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item.-
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