2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/303846
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Linking Cancer and Intimate Partner Violence
Author(s):
Cesario, Sandra
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Beta
Author Details:
Sandra Cesario, PhD, RNC, FAAN, scesario@twu.edu
Abstract:

Session presented on: Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Design: Face-to-face interviews were conducted every four months for a seven-year study to determine prevalence of cancer among abused women.

Sample: A total of 300 English and Spanish speaking women have been enrolled in the overarching seven-year study. Half of the total sample was recruited from the District Attorney�s (DA�s) office (n = 150), and the remaining half was recruited from various residential shelters for women experiencing IPV (n = 150).

Methods: The design yielded both quantitative and qualitative data.

Results: Of the 300 women, eight women reported receiving a cancer diagnosis, six of which were cervical cancers. The prevalence of cervical cancer reported by abused women, 20 women per 1,000, is significantly higher when compared to the rate of approximately 2 per 1,000 reported in the general population of women of the same ages. Abused women with cancer also reported high danger scores and risk for re-victimization

Conclusion/Implications for Nursing Practice: Chronic stress, depression, lower self-efficacy, childhood physical abuse and other high risk behaviors predispose a woman to cancer. This research suggests partner abuse may be an additional risk factor. Women in abusive relationships are less likely to receive preventive health care services. Increased awareness of the possible connection between IPV and cancer is needed. Evidence-based strategies that promote IPV screening in the oncology setting as well as offering cancer screening to victims of IPV should be considered.

Keywords:
Cancer and abuse of women; Chronic disease and abuse of women
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLinking Cancer and Intimate Partner Violenceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCesario, Sandraen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Betaen_GB
dc.author.detailsSandra Cesario, PhD, RNC, FAAN, scesario@twu.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/303846-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Tuesday, July 23, 2013</p><p>Design: Face-to-face interviews were conducted every four months for a seven-year study to determine prevalence of cancer among abused women. <p>Sample: A total of 300 English and Spanish speaking women have been enrolled in the overarching seven-year study. Half of the total sample was recruited from the District Attorney�s (DA�s) office (n = 150), and the remaining half was recruited from various residential shelters for women experiencing IPV (n = 150). <p>Methods: The design yielded both quantitative and qualitative data. <p>Results: Of the 300 women, eight women reported receiving a cancer diagnosis, six of which were cervical cancers. The prevalence of cervical cancer reported by abused women, 20 women per 1,000, is significantly higher when compared to the rate of approximately 2 per 1,000 reported in the general population of women of the same ages. Abused women with cancer also reported high danger scores and risk for re-victimization <p>Conclusion/Implications for Nursing Practice: Chronic stress, depression, lower self-efficacy, childhood physical abuse and other high risk behaviors predispose a woman to cancer. This research suggests partner abuse may be an additional risk factor. Women in abusive relationships are less likely to receive preventive health care services. Increased awareness of the possible connection between IPV and cancer is needed. Evidence-based strategies that promote IPV screening in the oncology setting as well as offering cancer screening to victims of IPV should be considered.<span></span>en_GB
dc.subjectCancer and abuse of womenen_GB
dc.subjectChronic disease and abuse of womenen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:24:20Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:24:20Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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