A 7-Year Prospective Study: Differences Among U.S.-Born Abused Women and Non-U.S.-Born Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/303848
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A 7-Year Prospective Study: Differences Among U.S.-Born Abused Women and Non-U.S.-Born Women
Author(s):
Montalvo Liendo, Nora
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Nora Montalvo Liendo, PhD, RN, nora.montalvo@gmail.com
Abstract:

Session presented on: Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Purpose: An estimated 18.9 million immigrant women reside in the US. Immigrant women are subject to increased violence. It is evident from recent studies that a woman's citizenship status does not exempt her from exposure to partner violence.� The purpose of this presentation is to examine social support, self-efficacy and marginalization of abused women and how they differ based on US-born compared to non-US-born, with and without documentation.

Methods:�A 7-year prospective design of 300 English and Spanish speaking women began in 2010.� Approximately 38% of the women were born outside the U.S.

Results: Women who were born in the US had significantly higher self-efficacy and marginality scores compared to non-US-born women without documents. No significant differences in social support among abused women who are US-born compared to non-US-born with and without documentation.� Women who were not born in the US and did not have documents had higher marginalization scores than both women born in the US and those women not born in the US but possessed documents.

Conclusions:� Undocumented women may be at greater risk for violence due to their increased marginalization and decreased self efficacy.� Evidence from this study will be used to inform practice and policy to improve the protection and safety of women who live with abuse.

Keywords:
Immigrant women; Abuse of Women
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA 7-Year Prospective Study: Differences Among U.S.-Born Abused Women and Non-U.S.-Born Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMontalvo Liendo, Noraen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsNora Montalvo Liendo, PhD, RN, nora.montalvo@gmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/303848-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Tuesday, July 23, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b>An estimated 18.9 million immigrant women reside in the US. Immigrant women are subject to increased violence. It is evident from recent studies that a woman's citizenship status does not exempt her from exposure to partner violence.� The purpose of this presentation is to examine social support, self-efficacy and marginalization of abused women and how they differ based on US-born compared to non-US-born, with and without documentation. <p><b>Methods</b>:�A 7-year prospective design of 300 English and Spanish speaking women began in 2010.� Approximately 38% of the women were born outside the U.S. <p><b>Results</b><b>:</b> Women who were born in the US had significantly higher self-efficacy and marginality scores compared to non-US-born women without documents. No significant differences in social support among abused women who are US-born compared to non-US-born with and without documentation.� Women who were not born in the US and did not have documents had higher marginalization scores than both women born in the US and those women not born in the US but possessed documents. <p><b>Conclusions:</b>� Undocumented women may be at greater risk for violence due to their increased marginalization and decreased self efficacy.� Evidence from this study will be used to inform practice and policy to improve the protection and safety of women who live with abuse.en_GB
dc.subjectImmigrant womenen_GB
dc.subjectAbuse of Womenen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:24:23Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:24:23Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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