2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/303849
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Marginalization Among Abused Women
Author(s):
Koci, Anne Floyd
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Beta
Author Details:
Anne Floyd Koci, PhD, APRN-BC, cFNP, WHNP, akoci1@twu.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Globally, violence against women remains at epidemic proportion with 50% of women reporting physical or sexual abuse. Physical and sexual abuse adversely affects the health of women and may increase their marginalization. Immigrant women may be even more marginalized. Marginalized women are more socially isolated which restricts them in accessing needed resources. The purpose of this study was examine 1) if there is a difference in marginalization between abused women who seek safety in an emergency shelter or those who seek safety through a protection order; and  2) if there are differences in marginalization among US born, documented non-US born and undocumented non-US born abused women.

Methods: DESIGN: A naturalistic longitudinal prospective comparative design with outcome measures at baseline and every 4 months for 7 years. Baseline data, collected in 2011, was used for this study.  SAMPLE: 300 women who have experienced first time domestic abuse and who choose to either enter a shelter (n=150) or apply for a protection order through the justice system (n=150). MEASURE:  Koci Marginality Index alpha Cronbach in this sample = .84.  Data analyzed with ANOVA.

Results: There was a significant difference in marginalization scores (p=.035) between abused women who seek protection orders (M=12.72, SD=5.16) and abused women who seek safety in emergency shelters (M=14.03, SD=5.58) and significant differences (p=.024) among US born (M=12.76, SD=5.34), documented non-US born (M=13.86, SD=5.69) and undocumented non-US born (M=14.81, SD=5.14) abused women.

Conclusions: Abused women who seek safety in emergency shelters and immigrant women report greater marginalization scores. Greater marginalization may place these women at greater risk for revictimization and restrict their ability to access resources. Identifying marginalized women early may aid in obtaining needed resources for these women.

Keywords:
marginalization; abused women
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMarginalization Among Abused Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKoci, Anne Floyden_GB
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Betaen_GB
dc.author.detailsAnne Floyd Koci, PhD, APRN-BC, cFNP, WHNP, akoci1@twu.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/303849-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Globally, violence against women remains at epidemic proportion with 50% of women reporting physical or sexual abuse. Physical and sexual abuse adversely affects the health of women and may increase their marginalization. Immigrant women may be even more marginalized. Marginalized women are more socially isolated which restricts them in accessing needed resources. The purpose of this study was examine 1) if there is a difference in marginalization between abused women who seek safety in an emergency shelter or those who seek safety through a protection order; and  2) if there are differences in marginalization among US born, documented non-US born and undocumented non-US born abused women. <p>Methods: DESIGN: A naturalistic longitudinal prospective comparative design with outcome measures at baseline and every 4 months for 7 years. Baseline data, collected in 2011, was used for this study.  SAMPLE: 300 women who have experienced first time domestic abuse and who choose to either enter a shelter (n=150) or apply for a protection order through the justice system (n=150). MEASURE:  Koci Marginality Index alpha Cronbach in this sample = .84.  Data analyzed with ANOVA. <p>Results: There was a significant difference in marginalization scores (p=.035) between abused women who seek protection orders (M=12.72, SD=5.16) and abused women who seek safety in emergency shelters (M=14.03, SD=5.58) and significant differences (p=.024) among US born (M=12.76, SD=5.34), documented non-US born (M=13.86, SD=5.69) and undocumented non-US born (M=14.81, SD=5.14) abused women. <p>Conclusions: Abused women who seek safety in emergency shelters and immigrant women report greater marginalization scores. Greater marginalization may place these women at greater risk for revictimization and restrict their ability to access resources. Identifying marginalized women early may aid in obtaining needed resources for these women.en_GB
dc.subjectmarginalizationen_GB
dc.subjectabused womenen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:24:24Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:24:24Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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