Attitudes of Mental Health Nurses to Self-Harm in Secure Forensic Settings: A Multi-Method Phenomenological Investigation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/303864
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Attitudes of Mental Health Nurses to Self-Harm in Secure Forensic Settings: A Multi-Method Phenomenological Investigation
Author(s):
Sandy, Peter Thomas
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Peter Thomas Sandy, RMN, BSc, PGDipED, MSc, PhD, petersandy123@hotmail.co.uk
Abstract:

Session presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Purpose:  The purpose of  this study is to develop an understanding of the attitudes of mental health nurses towards self-harm in secure forensic environments.

 Methods: This study adopted a multi-method phenomenological approach, and was conducted in secure environments within a large mental health Trust in England. It is first study to investigate DSH within secure settings using this menthodology. Data were collected using a semi-structured interview schedule. This involved 25 individual interviews and six focus groups. The data were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis.

Results: Mental health nurses have mixed attitudes towards self-harm, but mainly negative ones, which in the main relate to the impact of self-harm and to limited knowledge and skills.

Conclusion: These findings have implications for effective care provision. Routine education about self-harm should be provided for mental health nurses in secure settings in order to develop their attitudes, confidence and competence in care provision. Offering more training and support for mental health nurses may result in enhanced relationships with service users and thus, appropriate and effective care provision. The findings provide much needed information to assist those who are responsible for safeguarding this vulnerable group of adults.

Keywords:
Mental health nurses; Attitudes
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAttitudes of Mental Health Nurses to Self-Harm in Secure Forensic Settings: A Multi-Method Phenomenological Investigationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSandy, Peter Thomasen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsPeter Thomas Sandy, RMN, BSc, PGDipED, MSc, PhD, petersandy123@hotmail.co.uken_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/303864-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b> The purpose of  this study is to develop an understanding of the attitudes of mental health nurses towards self-harm in secure forensic environments. <p> <b>Methods: </b>This study adopted a multi-method phenomenological approach, and was conducted in secure environments within a large mental health Trust in England. It is first study to investigate DSH within secure settings using this menthodology. Data were collected using a semi-structured interview schedule. This involved 25 individual interviews and six focus groups. The data were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. <p><b>Results: </b>Mental health nurses have mixed attitudes towards self-harm, but mainly negative ones, which in the main relate to the impact of self-harm and to limited knowledge and skills. <p><b>Conclusion: </b> These findings have implications for effective care provision. Routine education about self-harm should be provided for mental health nurses in secure settings in order to develop their attitudes, confidence and competence in care provision. Offering more training and support for mental health nurses may result in enhanced relationships with service users and thus, appropriate and effective care provision.<b> </b>The findings provide much needed information to assist those who are responsible for safeguarding this vulnerable group of adults.en_GB
dc.subjectMental health nursesen_GB
dc.subjectAttitudesen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:24:42Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:24:42Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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