2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/303874
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patient-Centered Care: Facilitated Sleep in Critical Care
Author(s):
Brenton, Katelyn N.; Marcoux, Lauren
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Omicron Xi-at-Large
Author Details:
Katelyn N. Brenton, email: brentonk@my.husson.edu; Lauren Marcoux, RN, email: marcouxl@my.husson.edu
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Thursday, July 25, 2013, Wednesday, July 24, 2013 by Katelyn N. Brenton on behalf of the poster's co-author Lauren Marcoux. The poster was based on a senior capstone project authored by Lauren Marcoux, RN, a graduate of Husson University.

Purpose: With sleep deprivation, there is a significant drop in immune and cognitive functioning. Sleep deprivation negatively interferes with healing processes. This occurs when interruptions prevent patients from obtaining an entire 90 minute sleep cycle or a full sequence of sleep stages. The purpose of this study is to discover why patients are not sleeping well in hospital settings and the various methods nurses can implement in order to allow patients more time to sleep and heal. Nurses are responsible for providing patients adequate time to sleep, but also completing all the necessary tasks of patient care, which is difficult to balance during a busy shift.

Methods: Databases CINAHL, Nursing & Allied Health Collection, and Cochrane were searched using key words “sleep deprivation”, “intensive care unit”, and “nurse interventions”. Six articles were identified. The population of study was patients in the intensive care unit. Major nurse interventions implemented include noise and light reduction, improving patient comfort and clustering patient care activities. Patients receiving these interventions were compared to those who were not. The time frame was during the length of hospital stay in the intensive care unit. 

Results: Study results showed that many patients experience a loss of sleep when hospitalized in critical care units. In order to completely measure sleep patterns of patients, expensive, cumbersome equipment and skilled technicians are required. This serves as a large barrier to study this issue. Many of the interventions that nurses are using have been proven effective.

Conclusion: Interventions should be clustered to help facilitate patients’ sleep. Prioritizing is within the realm of nursing practice. More education for nursing staff and implementation of policies is needed to ensure that patients are receiving adequate sleep during their hospital stay. If nurses continue without this education, hospital stays may increase in length and patients may experience negative outcomes.

Keywords:
Nurse Interventions; Intensive Care Unit Patients; Sleep Deprivation
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatient-Centered Care: Facilitated Sleep in Critical Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrenton, Katelyn N.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorMarcoux, Lauren-
dc.contributor.departmentOmicron Xi-at-Largeen_GB
dc.author.detailsKatelyn N. Brenton, email: brentonk@my.husson.edu; Lauren Marcoux, RN, email: marcouxl@my.husson.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/303874-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Thursday, July 25, 2013, Wednesday, July 24, 2013 by Katelyn N. Brenton on behalf of the poster's co-author Lauren Marcoux. The poster was based on a senior capstone project authored by Lauren Marcoux, RN, a graduate of Husson University.</p><b>Purpose: </b> With sleep deprivation, there is a significant drop in immune and cognitive functioning. Sleep deprivation negatively interferes with healing processes. This occurs when interruptions prevent patients from obtaining an entire 90 minute sleep cycle or a full sequence of sleep stages. The purpose of this study is to discover why patients are not sleeping well in hospital settings and the various methods nurses can implement in order to allow patients more time to sleep and heal. Nurses are responsible for providing patients adequate time to sleep, but also completing all the necessary tasks of patient care, which is difficult to balance during a busy shift. <p><b>Methods: </b>Databases <i>CINAHL</i><i>, Nursing & Allied Health Collection</i>, and <i>Cochrane</i> were searched using key words “sleep deprivation”, “intensive care unit”, and “nurse interventions”. Six articles were identified. The population of study was patients in the intensive care unit. Major nurse interventions implemented include noise and light reduction, improving patient comfort and clustering patient care activities. Patients receiving these interventions were compared to those who were not. The time frame was during the length of hospital stay in the intensive care unit.  <p><b>Results: </b>Study results showed that many patients experience a loss of sleep when hospitalized in critical care units. In order to completely measure sleep patterns of patients, expensive, cumbersome equipment and skilled technicians are required. This serves as a large barrier to study this issue. Many of the interventions that nurses are using have been proven effective. <p><b>Conclusion: </b> Interventions should be clustered to help facilitate patients’ sleep. Prioritizing is within the realm of nursing practice. More education for nursing staff and implementation of policies is needed to ensure that patients are receiving adequate sleep during their hospital stay. If nurses continue without this education, hospital stays may increase in length and patients may experience negative outcomes.en_GB
dc.subjectNurse Interventionsen_GB
dc.subjectIntensive Care Unit Patientsen_GB
dc.subjectSleep Deprivationen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:24:53Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:24:53Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
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