The Significance of Low Health Literacy, Self-Management, and Compliance in Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/303895
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Significance of Low Health Literacy, Self-Management, and Compliance in Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes
Author(s):
Fuerstenberg, Jane
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Jane Fuerstenberg, BSN, RN, jfuerstenberg@gmail.com
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013, Thursday, July 25, 2013

Purpose: Low health literacy is a global health issue.  A 2010 UNESCO report states that 775 million adults worldwide lack basic reading and writing skills.  An individual’s health literacy may be significantly worse than his or her general literacy.  According to the Institute of Medicine (IOM), approximately 90 million people in the United States have basic or below basic health literacy skills that prevent them from being able to manage their health care outcomes effectively.  The IOM conceptual framework provides a model for health literacy research.  Data gathered from the World Health Organization indicates there are 347 million people worldwide who have diabetes.  They further claim that Type 2 diabetes represents more than 85% of these cases.  The purpose of this project is to examine the relationship between low health literacy skills, self-management, and compliance in patients with Type 2 diabetes.

Methods: This project will use a descriptive correlational study design.  The following data collection tools will be administered to a convenience sample of 53 adult subjects: a demographic questionnaire, Newest Vital Sign, Diabetes Numeracy Test-15, and Summary of Diabetes Self-care Activities.  The research questions for this study are: 1) what is the relationship between health literacy, self-management, and compliance; 2) what is the prevalence of low health literacy among a cohort of patients with Type 2 diabetes; and 3) what are the demographic factors associated with health literacy?

Results: The pilot phase of this study and subject recruitment is currently in progress. 

Conclusion: Low levels of health literacy have been linked to non-compliance and poor health outcomes.  Findings from this study could benefit nursing educators by helping them better understand the importance of health literacy screening, variables associated with low health literacy skills, and the interaction of these variables with self-management and compliance in patients with Type 2 diabetes.

Keywords:
Type 2 diabetes; Diabetes self-management; Health literacy
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Significance of Low Health Literacy, Self-Management, and Compliance in Individuals with Type 2 Diabetesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFuerstenberg, Janeen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsJane Fuerstenberg, BSN, RN, jfuerstenberg@gmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/303895-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013, Thursday, July 25, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b> Low health literacy is a global health issue.  A 2010 UNESCO report states that 775 million adults worldwide lack basic reading and writing skills.  An individual’s health literacy may be significantly worse than his or her general literacy.  According to the Institute of Medicine (IOM), approximately 90 million people in the United States have basic or below basic health literacy skills that prevent them from being able to manage their health care outcomes effectively.  The IOM conceptual framework provides a model for health literacy research.  Data gathered from the World Health Organization indicates there are 347 million people worldwide who have diabetes.  They further claim that Type 2 diabetes represents more than 85% of these cases.  The purpose of this project is to examine the relationship between low health literacy skills, self-management, and compliance in patients with Type 2 diabetes. <p><b>Methods: </b> This project will use a descriptive correlational study design.  The following data collection tools will be administered to a convenience sample of 53 adult subjects: a demographic questionnaire, Newest Vital Sign, Diabetes Numeracy Test-15, and Summary of Diabetes Self-care Activities.  The research questions for this study are: 1) what is the relationship between health literacy, self-management, and compliance; 2) what is the prevalence of low health literacy among a cohort of patients with Type 2 diabetes; and 3) what are the demographic factors associated with health literacy? <p><b>Results: </b> The pilot phase of this study and subject recruitment is currently in progress.  <p><b>Conclusion: </b> Low levels of health literacy have been linked to non-compliance and poor health outcomes.  Findings from this study could benefit nursing educators by helping them better understand the importance of health literacy screening, variables associated with low health literacy skills, and the interaction of these variables with self-management and compliance in patients with Type 2 diabetes.en_GB
dc.subjectType 2 diabetesen_GB
dc.subjectDiabetes self-managementen_GB
dc.subjectHealth literacyen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:25:20Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:25:20Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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