2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/303931
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Social Networks of Foster Parents
Author(s):
Barbel, Paula A.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Epsilon Xi
Author Details:
Paula A. Barbel, PhD, PNP, pneil@brockport.edu
Abstract:

Session presented on: Friday, July 26, 2013

Purpose: To explore the structure and function of the social networks of foster parents caring for children in foster care; and second, to examine the relationship between the dimensions of foster parent social networks, perceived quality of network support, parental competence, and parental representations.  

Methods: A quantitative descriptive cross sectional study was conducted with 26 certified foster parents in upstate New York. Data were gathered using a social network questionnaire, the Child Behavioral Checklist parent report (CBCL), the parental competence subscale of the Parental Stress Index and the Parent Development Interview (PDI). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, correlations and UCINET 6. John Belsky’s Determinants of Parenting Model was adapted for use in this study.

Results: Foster parents had small (M = 4.7, SD =2.74), fairly dense social networks (M = 0.724, SD = 0.193). Caseworkers were the most important members of the foster parent formal social network system. Foster parents who were more satisfied with the emotional support they received from their network members (r = .619, p = .001) were also more satisfied with the advice and information received (r = .619, p = .002). Foster parents often had missing ties to the educational, legal and health care network members. Foster parents had ordinary parental reflective functioning (M = 5.81, SD = 1.55) and felt competent in parenting their child in foster care (M = 26.85, SD = 5.87).

Conclusion: The study results suggested a need for greater integration of foster parent formal network systems in order to provide the supports needed to enhance better health and mental health outcomes for children in foster care. Foster parents and formal network members including health care providers also require additional training to effectively meet the needs of children in foster care.

Keywords:
Foster Care; Foster Parent; Social Network
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Social Networks of Foster Parentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarbel, Paula A.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentEpsilon Xien_GB
dc.author.detailsPaula A. Barbel, PhD, PNP, pneil@brockport.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/303931-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Friday, July 26, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b>To explore the structure and function of the social networks of foster parents caring for children in foster care; and second, to examine the relationship between the dimensions of foster parent social networks, perceived quality of network support, parental competence, and parental representations.   <p><b>Methods: </b> A quantitative descriptive cross sectional study was conducted with 26 certified foster parents in upstate New York. Data were gathered using a social network questionnaire, the Child Behavioral Checklist parent report (CBCL), the parental competence subscale of the Parental Stress Index and the Parent Development Interview (PDI). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, correlations and UCINET 6. John Belsky’s Determinants of Parenting Model was adapted for use in this study. <p><b>Results: </b>Foster parents had small <i>(M = 4.7, SD =2.74),</i> fairly dense social networks <i>(M = 0.724, SD = 0.193)</i>. Caseworkers were the most important members of the foster parent formal social network system. Foster parents who were more satisfied with the emotional support they received from their network members (<i>r = .619, p = .001</i>) were also more satisfied with the advice and information received (<i>r = .619, p = .002</i>). Foster parents often had missing ties to the educational, legal and health care network members. Foster parents had ordinary parental reflective functioning <i>(M = 5.81, SD = 1.55)</i> and felt competent in parenting their child in foster care <i>(M = 26.85, SD = 5.87).</i><p><b>Conclusion: </b>The study results suggested a need for greater integration of foster parent formal network systems in order to provide the supports needed to enhance better health and mental health outcomes for children in foster care. Foster parents and formal network members including health care providers also require additional training to effectively meet the needs of children in foster care.en_GB
dc.subjectFoster Careen_GB
dc.subjectFoster Parenten_GB
dc.subjectSocial Networken_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:26:07Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:26:07Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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