King's Conceptual System Theory in Understanding Social Cultural Perceptions of Kenyan Women with HIV

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/303937
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
King's Conceptual System Theory in Understanding Social Cultural Perceptions of Kenyan Women with HIV
Author(s):
Mwangi, Rosemary
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Rosemary Mwangi, RN, BS, MSN, rmwangi@lacusc.org
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Thursday, July 25, 2013, Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Purpose: This presentation will  illustrates how King's Conceptual System theory provided direction  and informed  the conduct of research seeking to understand perceptions of women living with HIV/AIDS in Kenya. Kings theory  which depicts open systems that constantly  interact with their environment was an excellent fit in understanding social and societal structures  identified in the women experiences.

Methods: This study combined qualitative and quantitative methodologies in order to measure and also gain a deep understanding of the social cultural perceptions of the Kenyan women living with HIV/AIDS. Qualitative data was collected using a psychometric instrument and qualitative data  used semi- structured open ended questions. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze quantitative data and a qualitative content analysis was conducted on the open-ended survey responses as a means of identifying common responses among participants.

Results: Since the study variables could be conveniently grouped into the personal, interpersonal, and social system categories used in King's theory, quantitative  significant findings were discussed and amplified or correlated with the corresponding qualitative findings. Significant correlation results to the women characteristics were found for constructs of verbal abuse, health care neglect, social isolation, fear of contagion, and total stigma score, yet no significance was found for workplace stigma.  From the mean values, the highest stigma construct scores included negative self-perception and social isolation, followed by verbal abuse.  Least often reported were the elements of health care neglect, fear of contagion, and work place stigma.  In total, five of seven scale scores differed significantly between urban and rural participants (urban women scoring lower), indicating that the rural women experienced higher stigmas compared to the urban participants.

Conclusion: The King's Conceptual theory structures and constructs informed both the qualitative and quantitative findings and showed evidence that strongly support this theoretical model which advances nursing knowledge.

Keywords:
Theory; Kenya; King
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleKing's Conceptual System Theory in Understanding Social Cultural Perceptions of Kenyan Women with HIVen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMwangi, Rosemaryen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsRosemary Mwangi, RN, BS, MSN, rmwangi@lacusc.orgen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/303937-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Thursday, July 25, 2013, Wednesday, July 24, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b>This presentation will  illustrates how King's Conceptual System theory provided direction  and informed  the conduct of research seeking to understand perceptions of women living with HIV/AIDS in Kenya. Kings theory  which depicts open systems that constantly  interact with their environment was an excellent fit in understanding social and societal structures  identified in the women experiences. <p><b>Methods: </b>This study combined qualitative and quantitative methodologies in order to measure and also gain a deep understanding of the social cultural perceptions of the Kenyan women living with HIV/AIDS. Qualitative data was collected using a psychometric instrument and qualitative data  used semi- structured open ended questions. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze quantitative data and a qualitative content analysis was conducted on the open-ended survey responses as a means of identifying common responses among participants. <p><b>Results: </b>Since the study variables could be conveniently grouped into the personal, interpersonal, and social system categories used in King's theory, quantitative  significant findings were discussed and amplified or correlated with the corresponding qualitative findings. Significant correlation results to the women characteristics were found for constructs of verbal abuse, health care neglect, social isolation, fear of contagion, and total stigma score, yet no significance was found for workplace stigma.  From the mean values, the highest stigma construct scores included negative self-perception and social isolation, followed by verbal abuse.  Least often reported were the elements of health care neglect, fear of contagion, and work place stigma.  In total, five of seven scale scores differed significantly between urban and rural participants (urban women scoring lower), indicating that the rural women experienced higher stigmas compared to the urban participants. <p><b>Conclusion: </b>The King's Conceptual theory structures and constructs informed both the qualitative and quantitative findings and showed evidence that strongly support this theoretical model which advances nursing knowledge.en_GB
dc.subjectTheoryen_GB
dc.subjectKenyaen_GB
dc.subjectKingen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:26:14Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:26:14Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.