2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/303963
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Late Effects and Health Concerns in Childhood Cancer Survivors
Author(s):
Wu, Li-Min
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lambda Beta
Author Details:
Li-Min Wu, PhD, painting@ms22.hinet.net
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013, Thursday, July 25, 2013

Purpose:

  To describe late effects and health concerns in childhood cancer survivors in pediatric clinical practice

Methods:

 Triangulation method was used to data collection. Open-ended interviews were conducted in a quiet in-hospital setting. Interview data were analyzed using content analysis. Structure questionnaires were used to assess late effects. 178 childhood cancer survivors at age between 7 and 20 years old were recruited from 2011 to 2012 in Taiwan.

Results:

Only 7% of childhood cancer survivors were drop from school because of inadaptation. 14.4% childhood cancer survivors had over 6 adverse events in. 27.5% children had obesity. The most frequency of late effects was fatigue (20%), cognitive problems (18.7%), and gastrointestinal problems (13.6%). The main concerns of childhood cancer survivors were relapse (32%), nutrition (25.3%), and self-care (13%). Childhood cancer survivors with brain tumor had significant higher adverse events than ALL, and Non-CNS tumor (F= 4.82, p= .003). Receiving radiation of survivors had significant higher adverse events than those had not received (F= 14.98, p= .001).

Conclusion:

Only 22.8% childhood cancer survivors were free from late effects. The frequency of adverse events in childhood cancer survivors was different from diagnosis, and having radiation. Survivors needed to be knowledge about the possible consequences of treatments, and health care system need to develop a long-term and follow-up care to prevent and treat late effects early.

Keywords:
childhood cancer survivors; health concerns; late effects
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLate Effects and Health Concerns in Childhood Cancer Survivorsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWu, Li-Minen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentLambda Betaen_GB
dc.author.detailsLi-Min Wu, PhD, painting@ms22.hinet.neten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/303963-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013, Thursday, July 25, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b> <p> <b> </b>To describe late effects and health concerns in childhood cancer survivors in pediatric clinical practice <p><b>Methods: </b> <p> Triangulation method was used to data collection. Open-ended interviews were conducted in a quiet in-hospital setting. Interview data were analyzed using content analysis. Structure questionnaires were used to assess late effects. 178 childhood cancer survivors at age between 7 and 20 years old were recruited from 2011 to 2012 in Taiwan. <p><b>Results: </b> <p>Only 7% of childhood cancer survivors were drop from school because of inadaptation. 14.4% childhood cancer survivors had over 6 adverse events in. 27.5% children had obesity. The most frequency of late effects was fatigue (20%), cognitive problems (18.7%), and gastrointestinal problems (13.6%). The main concerns of childhood cancer survivors were relapse (32%), nutrition (25.3%), and self-care (13%). Childhood cancer survivors with brain tumor had significant higher adverse events than ALL, and Non-CNS tumor (F= 4.82, p= .003). Receiving radiation of survivors had significant higher adverse events than those had not received (F= 14.98, p= .001). <p><b>Conclusion: </b> <p>Only 22.8% childhood cancer survivors were free from late effects. The frequency of adverse events in childhood cancer survivors was different from diagnosis, and having radiation. Survivors needed to be knowledge about the possible consequences of treatments, and health care system need to develop a long-term and follow-up care to prevent and treat late effects early.en_GB
dc.subjectchildhood cancer survivorsen_GB
dc.subjecthealth concernsen_GB
dc.subjectlate effectsen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:26:42Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:26:42Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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