Is Problem-Based Learning Beneficial for Undergraduate Nursing Students?: A South African Perspective

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Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/303976
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Is Problem-Based Learning Beneficial for Undergraduate Nursing Students?: A South African Perspective
Author(s):
Bruce, Judith C.; Mtshali-Qamata, Norma; Lack, Melanie
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Tau Lambda
Author Details:
Judith C. Bruce, PhD, RN, RM, Judith.Bruce@wits.ac.za; Norma Mtshali-Qamata, RN, MSc; Melanie Lack, RN, MSc;
Abstract:

Session presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Purpose:

'The'purpose of this research was twofold: to determine nursing students' performance in problem-based learning (PBL) tutorials and to compare their self-directed learning readiness (SDL) against nursing students following a traditional Lecture-based Learning (LBL) curriculum. The study objectives were to:

  • describe student nurses' performance in PBL tutorial groups with reference to self assessment and facilitator assessment
  • compare students' readiness for self-directed learning with respect to their desire to learn, self management and self control.

Methods:

A cross-sectional, comparative, design was used to meet the aim of the study. A computer-based Tutorial Performance Evaluator with 7 main items (constructs) and 34 sub-items was used to elicit data on students' self - and facilitator assessment; a 40-item SDL Readiness Scale, was used to collect data from the total population of nursing students (N=201) at two South African universities; the response rate was 79.1%, resulting in a sample size of 159.

Results:

'The results show significant differences between facilitator and student assessment with poor performance in all PBL constructs measured - the lowest performance is in the first year (mean 27.49%).' There is a significant improvement in PBL performance in the remaining years with reference to problem-solving, communication, critical thinking, learning skills and personal growth. With reference to self-directed learning there was no significance in the differences between the two curriculum groups with respect to their reported self-management ability (p=0.82), their desire for learning (p=0.90) and self- control (0.17). Both groups had similar mean scores, with slight differences in their standard deviation.

Conclusion:

These findings suggest that students struggle in PBL tutorials and that self assessment varies significantly from that of the facilitator. Furthermore, these results are educationally significant pointing to the recommended use of curriculum approaches that are non-traditional and that encourage ownership of learning and independence early in the curriculum.

Keywords:
Tutorial performance; Problem-based learning; Self-directed learning
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013 ; 22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleIs Problem-Based Learning Beneficial for Undergraduate Nursing Students?: A South African Perspectiveen
dc.contributor.authorBruce, Judith C.en
dc.contributor.authorMtshali-Qamata, Normaen
dc.contributor.authorLack, Melanieen
dc.contributor.departmentTau Lambdaen
dc.author.detailsJudith C. Bruce, PhD, RN, RM, Judith.Bruce@wits.ac.za; Norma Mtshali-Qamata, RN, MSc; Melanie Lack, RN, MSc;en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/303976-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b> <p>'The'purpose of this research was twofold: to determine nursing students' performance in problem-based learning (PBL) tutorials and to compare their self-directed learning readiness (SDL) against nursing students following a traditional Lecture-based Learning (LBL) curriculum. The study objectives were to: <ul> <li>describe student nurses' performance in PBL tutorial groups with reference to self assessment and facilitator assessment</li> <li>compare students' readiness for self-directed learning with respect to their desire to learn, self management and self control.<b></b></li> </ul><p><b>Methods: </b> <p>A cross-sectional, comparative, design was used to meet the aim of the study. A computer-based Tutorial Performance Evaluator with 7 main items (constructs) and 34 sub-items was used to elicit data on students' self - and facilitator assessment; a 40-item SDL Readiness Scale, was used to collect data from the total population of nursing students (N=201) at two South African universities; the response rate was 79.1%, resulting in a sample size of 159. <p><b>Results: </b> <p>'The results show significant differences between facilitator and student assessment with poor performance in all PBL constructs measured - the lowest performance is in the first year (mean 27.49%).' There is a significant improvement in PBL performance in the remaining years with reference to problem-solving, communication, critical thinking, learning skills and personal growth. With reference to self-directed learning there was no significance in the differences between the two curriculum groups with respect to their reported self-management ability (p=0.82), their desire for learning (p=0.90) and self- control (0.17). Both groups had similar mean scores, with slight differences in their standard deviation. <p><b>Conclusion: </b> <p>These findings suggest that students struggle in PBL tutorials and that self assessment varies significantly from that of the facilitator. Furthermore, these results are educationally significant pointing to the recommended use of curriculum approaches that are non-traditional and that encourage ownership of learning and independence early in the curriculum.en
dc.subjectTutorial performanceen
dc.subjectProblem-based learningen
dc.subjectSelf-directed learningen
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:26:56Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22en
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:26:56Z-
dc.conference.date2013en
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en
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