2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/303990
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Care Guidelines for Adults with Near Death Experiences
Author(s):
Corcoran, Diane K.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Diane K. Corcoran, RN, PhD, dcorcoran1946@gmail.com
Abstract:

Session presented on: Thursday, July 25, 2013

Near-death experiences (NDEs) are profound psychological events with transcendental elements typically occurring to individuals close to death or in situations of intense physical or emotional danger.' NDEs have the potential to transform a person's life and beliefs.' Research on NDEs spans about 37 years.' NDE research has focused on the NDE elements, veridical content, aftereffects, explanatory models, cultural differences, childhood NDEs, and patient care.'' New perspectives include shared death experiences (SDEs), such as people in the same car accident.' NDE researchers are only beginning to address the larger questions of consciousness, the afterlife, the nature of reality. 'More than 15 common features in the NDE have been reported in the literature and these are common across cultures and religions. No two experiences are identical and no single feature is found in every NDE but the most commonly reported NDE involves intense feelings of peace, joy and love, often an encounter with an unconditionally loving light.' Surveys taken in the US, Australia, and Germany suggest that 4 to 15 % of the population have had NDEs. A large study conducted in the Netherlands showed that 18% of people who suffered a cardiac arrest, and were clinically dead, later reported an NDE. ''A few of the common after affects of NDEs include light and sound sensitivity, being more altruistic, changes in thought processes, less tolerance for medication/chemicals, heightened sensations of touch, taste, smell, texture; new conviction about life purpose.' Patients at end-of-life may have more than one NDE.' Guidelines for nursing care will be presented in several areas such as:' assessment, therapeutic communication, how to talk with family members about NDEs and what to expect, how to talk with other providers about NDEs, and what resources are available for patients with NDEs.
Keywords:
care guidelines; near death experience; adult nursing
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013 ; 22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleNursing Care Guidelines for Adults with Near Death Experiencesen
dc.contributor.authorCorcoran, Diane K.en
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsDiane K. Corcoran, RN, PhD, dcorcoran1946@gmail.comen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/303990-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Thursday, July 25, 2013</p>Near-death experiences (NDEs) are profound psychological events with transcendental elements typically occurring to individuals close to death or in situations of intense physical or emotional danger.' NDEs have the potential to transform a person's life and beliefs.' Research on NDEs spans about 37 years.' NDE research has focused on the NDE elements, veridical content, aftereffects, explanatory models, cultural differences, childhood NDEs, and patient care.'' New perspectives include shared death experiences (SDEs), such as people in the same car accident.' NDE researchers are only beginning to address the larger questions of consciousness, the afterlife, the nature of reality. 'More than 15 common features in the NDE have been reported in the literature and these are common across cultures and religions. No two experiences are identical and no single feature is found in every NDE but the most commonly reported NDE involves intense feelings of peace, joy and love, often an encounter with an unconditionally loving light.' Surveys taken in the US, Australia, and Germany suggest that 4 to 15 % of the population have had NDEs. A large study conducted in the Netherlands showed that 18% of people who suffered a cardiac arrest, and were clinically dead, later reported an NDE. ''A few of the common after affects of NDEs include light and sound sensitivity, being more altruistic, changes in thought processes, less tolerance for medication/chemicals, heightened sensations of touch, taste, smell, texture; new conviction about life purpose.' Patients at end-of-life may have more than one NDE.' Guidelines for nursing care will be presented in several areas such as:' assessment, therapeutic communication, how to talk with family members about NDEs and what to expect, how to talk with other providers about NDEs, and what resources are available for patients with NDEs.en
dc.subjectcare guidelinesen
dc.subjectnear death experienceen
dc.subjectadult nursingen
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:27:14Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22en
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:27:14Z-
dc.conference.date2013en
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en
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