2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/303994
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Why Newly Graduated Nurses Left Their Job?L The Taiwanese Experiences
Author(s):
Lee, Tsorng-yeh
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lambada beta
Author Details:
Tsorng-yeh Lee, PhD, tsylee@yorku.ca
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Monday, July 22, 2013, Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Purpose:

The turnover rate in nursing is pretty high in many countries around the world and is as serious in Taiwan as anywhere else. New nurses often left their first job in the first three months after they were hired in Taiwan. Many nurses changed their occupation registry within one year and furthermore some of them never went back to work as a nurse. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore the experience and decision making process of newly graduated nurses who left their job in Taiwan.

Methods:

A phenomenological approach and in-depth interviews were used. A purposive sample of newly graduated nurses was recruited from 10 general hospitals after they had decided to leave their job in Taiwan. Sixty new nurses were interviewed. The interview was tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed using content analysis.

Results:

Reasons cited for leaving their job included: heavy workload, inconsistent on-job training, non-supportive colleagues, conflict of schedule, unfulfilled personal accomplishment, lacking of quality of life and dissatisfied salary. As regards to their future career plan, a small portion of nurses indicated their intent to leave the nursing profession completely. The majority mentioned that they still love the nursing profession and would continue to search a better working environment for themselves.

Conclusion:

This is hoped that the result of this study could provide more information for the nurse mangers and hospital administrators to redesign their training program for new nurses and developing strategies for recruitment therefore promoting long-term retention of nurses. This study may also provide information on nurse’s role adaptation, so they can fit themselves in the changing healthcare working environments more efficiently.

Keywords:
Intention to leave jobs; Newly graduated nurses; The phenomenological approach
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhy Newly Graduated Nurses Left Their Job?L The Taiwanese Experiencesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLee, Tsorng-yehen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentLambada betaen_GB
dc.author.detailsTsorng-yeh Lee, PhD, tsylee@yorku.caen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/303994-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Monday, July 22, 2013, Tuesday, July 23, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b> <p>The turnover rate in nursing is pretty high in many countries around the world and is as serious in Taiwan as anywhere else. New nurses often left their first job in the first three months after they were hired in Taiwan. Many nurses changed their occupation registry within one year and furthermore some of them never went back to work as a nurse. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore the experience and decision making process of newly graduated nurses who left their job in Taiwan. <p><b>Methods: </b> <p>A phenomenological approach and in-depth interviews were used. A purposive sample of newly graduated nurses was recruited from 10 general hospitals after they had decided to leave their job in Taiwan. Sixty new nurses were interviewed. The interview was tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed using content analysis. <p><b>Results: </b> <p>Reasons cited for leaving their job included: heavy workload, inconsistent on-job training, non-supportive colleagues, conflict of schedule, unfulfilled personal accomplishment, lacking of quality of life and dissatisfied salary. As regards to their future career plan, a small portion of nurses indicated their intent to leave the nursing profession completely. The majority mentioned that they still love the nursing profession and would continue to search a better working environment for themselves. <p><b>Conclusion: </b> <p>This is hoped that the result of this study could provide more information for the nurse mangers and hospital administrators to redesign their training program for new nurses and developing strategies for recruitment therefore promoting long-term retention of nurses. This study may also provide information on nurse’s role adaptation, so they can fit themselves in the changing healthcare working environments more efficiently.en_GB
dc.subjectIntention to leave jobsen_GB
dc.subjectNewly graduated nursesen_GB
dc.subjectThe phenomenological approachen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:27:17Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:27:17Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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