Intervention “Dying care” in Patients with Death Anxiety in a Secularised Society

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304029
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Intervention “Dying care” in Patients with Death Anxiety in a Secularised Society
Author(s):
Kisvetrová, Helena
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Helena Kisvetrová, PhDr, MSc, RN, helena.kisvetrova@upol.cz
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013, Thursday, July 25, 2013

Purpose:  Secularisation is a phenomenon in contemporary consumer society. Death anxiety causes distress in the final stage of life, connected with the fear of pain, process of dying and confrontation with the Unknown. The NIC intervention “Dying care” consists of activities for bio-psycho-social-spiritual support. The aim was to learn which activities are realised by Czech nurses caring for the terminally ill with the nursing diagnosis Death Anxiety and which activities are feasible to be implemented into nursing practice in the Czech secularised society. The study is a part of a larger research focused on death anxiety.

Methods: Quantitative research, structured questionnaire with Likert scales. Respondents: 468 nurses. Workplace: hospice, oncology, geriatrics, long-term care institution, home for the elderly, home care. Length of work experience 15.5 years, SD 10.6 Statistical processing: chi-squared test with Bonferroni correction, Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests.

 Results: These activities were considered the most important: “Monitor pain” (38.9%), “Support the family’s efforts to remain at the bedside” (36.3%) and “Minimize discomfort, when possible” (22.4%). 11.3% responded „Facilitate obtaining spiritual support for patient and family”. In practice, the most common activities were: “Assist with basic care, as needed” (scale average 1.27), “Monitor pain” (1.29) and “Provide frequent rest periods” (1.34). Implementation of these activities was considered feasible in the Czech nursing practice. Depending on the type of workplace (more common with hospice nurses; p<0.05): “Monitor mood changes”, “Facilitate obtaining spiritual support for patient and family” and “Facilitate discussion on funeral arrangements”. Depending on the length of work experience (nurses with longer experience): “Monitor mood changes” (p=0.036) and “Include the family in care decisions and activities, as desired” (0.042). 

 Conclusion: The results suggest the influence of a secularised society on the nursing practice. Activities concerning psycho-social and spiritual dimensions are considered important, but are realised more often by hospice nurses.

Keywords:
dying care; death anxiety; terminally ill
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIntervention “Dying care” in Patients with Death Anxiety in a Secularised Societyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKisvetrová, Helenaen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsHelena Kisvetrová, PhDr, MSc, RN, helena.kisvetrova@upol.czen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304029-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013, Thursday, July 25, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b> Secularisation is a phenomenon in contemporary consumer society. Death anxiety causes distress in the final stage of life, connected with the fear of pain, process of dying and confrontation with the Unknown. The NIC intervention “Dying care” consists of activities for bio-psycho-social-spiritual support. The aim was to learn which activities are realised by Czech nurses caring for the terminally ill with the nursing diagnosis Death Anxiety and which activities are feasible to be implemented into nursing practice in the Czech secularised society. The study is a part of a larger research focused on death anxiety. <p><b>Methods: </b>Quantitative research, structured questionnaire with Likert scales. Respondents: 468 nurses. Workplace: hospice, oncology, geriatrics, long-term care institution, home for the elderly, home care. Length of work experience 15.5 years, SD 10.6 Statistical processing: chi-squared test with Bonferroni correction, Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. <p> <b>Results: </b>These activities were considered the most important: “Monitor pain” (38.9%), “Support the family’s efforts to remain at the bedside” (36.3%) and “Minimize discomfort, when possible” (22.4%). 11.3% responded „Facilitate obtaining spiritual support for patient and family”. In practice, the most common activities were: “Assist with basic care, as needed” (scale average 1.27), “Monitor pain” (1.29) and “Provide frequent rest periods” (1.34). Implementation of these activities was considered feasible in the Czech nursing practice. Depending on the type of workplace (more common with hospice nurses; p<0.05): “Monitor mood changes”, “Facilitate obtaining spiritual support for patient and family” and “Facilitate discussion on funeral arrangements”. Depending on the length of work experience (nurses with longer experience): “Monitor mood changes” (p=0.036) and “Include the family in care decisions and activities, as desired” (0.042).  <p> <b>Conclusion: </b>The results suggest the influence of a secularised society on the nursing practice. Activities concerning psycho-social and spiritual dimensions are considered important, but are realised more often by hospice nurses.en_GB
dc.subjectdying careen_GB
dc.subjectdeath anxietyen_GB
dc.subjectterminally illen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:27:54Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:27:54Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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