Are Family Conditions and Individual Factors an Obstacle for Aboriginal Students' Health?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304036
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Are Family Conditions and Individual Factors an Obstacle for Aboriginal Students' Health?
Author(s):
Yang, Rea-Jeng; Chin, Wen-Jou
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Rea-Jeng Yang, PhD, rea@ntunhs.edu.tw; Wen-Jou Chin, BS;
Abstract:

Session presented on: Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine whether the health events in the campus are best understood as effects of race, gender, and socioeconomic status.

Methods: A retrospective chart review was used. The data set was from the school-based health recording at the isolated, high minority junior high school in Taiwan. Our sample size was the entire 202 students in the school that have completed three academic-years, ranging from the 7th - 9th grade.

Results: 'Out of the 202 students studied, 57.4 % were boys and 33.2% aboriginal and 66.8% non-aboriginals. A total of 24.9% of the students lived without parents and 19.6% of students reported their families economic status was within the poor or poverty line. The total number of health problems was 887, that is, the average frequency of health problem was 4.4'5.4 per student. The health problems were ranked as follows: physical illness (416, 46.9%), injury (372, 41.9%), and emotional distress (99, 11.2%). 51% of the students, had experienced both physical and emotional health problems during their three-years learning period. Physical illness, injury, and emotional problems recurrence accounted for 22.2%, 29.2% and 4.5%, respectively. However, the amounts of health problems among the subjects decreased across the grades (404, 304, and 179, respectively). Aboriginal students were found to have more significant morbidity of health problems than non-aboriginal students (p < .05). Variables such as aboriginal, male students living without parents, and difficulty in family finance were significantly related to the students' health problems in the campus.

Conclusion: The aboriginal students in families with poor economical status remained at a disadvantaged situation, despite having the Nation Health Insurance coverage system. Furthermore, added efforts are needed to ensure that more eligible students are enrolled in high-touch health programs. Equally, non-financial barriers to health care must be addressed in order to reduce health inequities.

Keywords:
chart review; health problems; Aboriginal students
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013 ; 22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleAre Family Conditions and Individual Factors an Obstacle for Aboriginal Students' Health?en
dc.contributor.authorYang, Rea-Jengen
dc.contributor.authorChin, Wen-Jouen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsRea-Jeng Yang, PhD, rea@ntunhs.edu.tw; Wen-Jou Chin, BS;en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304036-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Tuesday, July 23, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b>The aim of this study was to examine whether the health events in the campus are best understood as effects of race, gender, and socioeconomic status. <p><b>Methods: </b>A retrospective chart review was used. The data set was from the school-based health recording at the isolated, high minority junior high school in Taiwan. Our sample size was the entire 202 students in the school that have completed three academic-years, ranging from the 7th - 9th grade. <p><b>Results: </b>'Out of the 202 students studied, 57.4 % were boys and 33.2% aboriginal and 66.8% non-aboriginals. A total of 24.9% of the students lived without parents and 19.6% of students reported their families economic status was within the poor or poverty line. The total number of health problems was 887, that is, the average frequency of health problem was 4.4'5.4 per student. The health problems were ranked as follows: physical illness (416, 46.9%), injury (372, 41.9%), and emotional distress (99, 11.2%). 51% of the students, had experienced both physical and emotional health problems during their three-years learning period. Physical illness, injury, and emotional problems recurrence accounted for 22.2%, 29.2% and 4.5%, respectively. However, the amounts of health problems among the subjects decreased across the grades (404, 304, and 179, respectively). Aboriginal students were found to have more significant morbidity of health problems than non-aboriginal students (p < .05). Variables such as aboriginal, male students living without parents, and difficulty in family finance were significantly related to the students' health problems in the campus. <p><b>Conclusion: </b>The aboriginal students in families with poor economical status remained at a disadvantaged situation, despite having the Nation Health Insurance coverage system. Furthermore, added efforts are needed to ensure that more eligible students are enrolled in high-touch health programs. Equally, non-financial barriers to health care must be addressed in order to reduce health inequities.en
dc.subjectchart reviewen
dc.subjecthealth problemsen
dc.subjectAboriginal studentsen
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:28:01Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22en
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:28:01Z-
dc.conference.date2013en
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en
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