Comparison of the Effects of Replacing Peripheral Intravenous Catheters at 96 Hours Versus 72 Hours Among Surgical Inpatients in Otorhinolaryngology Department: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304038
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of the Effects of Replacing Peripheral Intravenous Catheters at 96 Hours Versus 72 Hours Among Surgical Inpatients in Otorhinolaryngology Department: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial
Author(s):
Kuo, Chia-Chi; Wang, Wei-Na; Wang, Yu-Rung
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Chia-Chi Kuo, RN, MSN, kuochiachi63@gmail.com; Wei-Na Wang, MSN; Yu-Rung Wang, MSN, RN;
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013, Thursday, July 25, 2013

Background: Peripheral intravenous catheterisation is the most common invasive procedure in clinical practice. Traditionally, these catheters are routinely replaced every three days to prevent complications. Previous studies have indicated no significant differences in phlebitis rates between 72- and 96-hour intervals.

Purpose: The study was to explore the differences of associated complications of phlebitis as well as the manpower and cost involved when replacing peripheral intravenous catheters every 96 hours versus 72 hours among surgical inpatients in an otorhinolaryngology department.

Methods: A pilot, two-group, pretest-posttest randomized controlled trial design was adopted. Using convenience sampling, surgical inpatients in the otorhinolaryngology department of a medical center in southern Taiwan were recruited. Block randomization was used to assign 30 participants to the 96-hour group and 32 participants to the 72-hour group. Their pretest-posttest differences of associated complications of phlebitis as well as the manpower and cost involved were compared.

Results: No significant pretest-posttest differences (p = 1.00) were found in phlebitis, local infections, and catheter tip culture of both groups. The rates of phlebitis and local infections were 0% in both groups; each group had one case with positive catheter tip culture. The 72-hour group had significantly higher material and manpower costs than the 96-hour group (p < .0001).

Conclusion/Implications for practice: The evidence-based results indicated no significant differences in rates of complications of phlebitis, local infections, and catheter tip culture when replacing peripheral intravenous catheters at 96 hours versus 72 hours. However, the 96-hour group significantly reduced the cost and manpower consumption. Therefore, we suggest that if no infection signs at the intravenous injection sites are detected by nurses of three shifts, the optimal peripheral intravenous catheter replacement interval is 96 hours as compared to 72 hours.

Keywords:
peripheral intravenous catheters; phlebitis; evidence-based practice
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of the Effects of Replacing Peripheral Intravenous Catheters at 96 Hours Versus 72 Hours Among Surgical Inpatients in Otorhinolaryngology Department: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trialen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKuo, Chia-Chien_GB
dc.contributor.authorWang, Wei-Naen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWang, Yu-Rungen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsChia-Chi Kuo, RN, MSN, kuochiachi63@gmail.com; Wei-Na Wang, MSN; Yu-Rung Wang, MSN, RN;en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304038-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013, Thursday, July 25, 2013</p><b>Background</b>:<b> </b>Peripheral intravenous catheterisation is the most common invasive procedure in clinical practice. Traditionally, these catheters are routinely replaced every three days to prevent complications. Previous studies have indicated no significant differences in phlebitis rates between 72- and 96-hour intervals. <p><b>Purpose</b>: The study was to explore the differences of associated complications of phlebitis as well as the manpower and cost involved when replacing peripheral intravenous catheters every 96 hours versus 72 hours among surgical inpatients in an otorhinolaryngology department. <p><b>Methods</b>: A pilot, two-group, pretest-posttest randomized controlled trial design was adopted. Using convenience sampling, surgical inpatients in the otorhinolaryngology department of a medical center in southern Taiwan were recruited. Block randomization was used to assign 30 participants to the 96-hour group and 32 participants to the 72-hour group. Their pretest-posttest differences of associated complications of phlebitis as well as the manpower and cost involved were compared. <p><b>Results</b>: No significant pretest-posttest differences (<i>p</i> = 1.00) were found in phlebitis, local infections, and catheter tip culture of both groups. The rates of phlebitis and local infections were 0% in both groups; each group had one case with positive catheter tip culture. The 72-hour group had significantly higher material and manpower costs than the 96-hour group (<i>p </i>< .0001). <p><b>Conclusion/Implications for practice</b>: The evidence-based results indicated no significant differences in rates of complications of phlebitis, local infections, and catheter tip culture when replacing peripheral intravenous catheters at 96 hours versus 72 hours. However, the 96-hour group significantly reduced the cost and manpower consumption. Therefore, we suggest that if no infection signs at the intravenous injection sites are detected by nurses of three shifts, the optimal peripheral intravenous catheter replacement interval is 96 hours as compared to 72 hours.en_GB
dc.subjectperipheral intravenous cathetersen_GB
dc.subjectphlebitisen_GB
dc.subjectevidence-based practiceen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:28:03Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:28:03Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.