2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304045
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Postoperative Delirium on Outcomes after Cardiac Surgery
Author(s):
Mangusan, Ralph Francis; Hooper, Vallire D.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Omicron
Author Details:
Ralph Francis Mangusan, MSN, RN-BC, PCCN, CWCN, ralphmangusan@yahoo.com; Vallire D. Hooper, PhD, RN, CPAN, FAAN;
Abstract:

Session presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Purpose: This study was conducted to determine the effect of postoperative delirium on outcomes after cardiac surgery.

Methods: Research Design: Descriptive correlational design

Sample: 436 males and 220 females (N= 656) between the ages of 29 and 91 years who had cardiac surgery from January 10, 2011 to October 30, 2011 at Mission Hospital in Asheville, NC. Patients had the following procedures performed with the cardiopulmonary bypass machine: CABG, valve repair/ replacement, and CABG with valve repair/replacement. Of the total sample, 161 patients (24.54%) developed postoperative delirium. Charts were reviewed retrospectively and data were analyzed using t- test and Fisher’s exact test.

Results: The difference between postoperative delirium and no postoperative delirium groups along the following outcomes were significant: length of stay after surgery (p=.000), occurrence of falls (p=.001), patients discharged to a skilled nursing facility/long term acute care/rehabilitation center (p=.000), patients discharged to home with home health (p=.013), and patients who required inpatient physical therapy (p=.000). The following demographic variables were found to be related to postoperative delirium after cardiac surgery: age, cardiopulmonary bypass time, number of pre existing medical conditions; past medical history of: arrhythmias, CHF, and renal disease; type of surgery: CABG and CABG with valve surgery; and medications given after surgery: PO Benzodiazepines, IV Ketorolac, and Ambien.

Conclusion: Patients who develop postoperative delirium are more likely to experience poorer outcomes. They are more likely to fall, stay longer after surgery, be discharged to a nursing facility, be discharged to home with home health, and require inpatient physical therapy.

Keywords:
Cardiac surgery; Falls; Postoperative delirium
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Postoperative Delirium on Outcomes after Cardiac Surgeryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMangusan, Ralph Francisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHooper, Vallire D.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Omicronen_GB
dc.author.detailsRalph Francis Mangusan, MSN, RN-BC, PCCN, CWCN, ralphmangusan@yahoo.com; Vallire D. Hooper, PhD, RN, CPAN, FAAN;en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304045-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b>This study was conducted to determine the effect of postoperative delirium on outcomes after cardiac surgery. <p><b>Methods: </b>Research Design: Descriptive correlational design <p>Sample: 436 males and 220 females (N= 656) between the ages of 29 and 91 years who had cardiac surgery from January 10, 2011 to October 30, 2011 at Mission Hospital in Asheville, NC. Patients had the following procedures performed with the cardiopulmonary bypass machine: CABG, valve repair/ replacement, and CABG with valve repair/replacement. Of the total sample, 161 patients (24.54%) developed postoperative delirium. Charts were reviewed retrospectively and data were analyzed using t- test and Fisher’s exact test. <p><b>Results: </b>The difference between postoperative delirium and no postoperative delirium groups along the following outcomes were significant: length of stay after surgery (p=.000), occurrence of falls (p=.001), patients discharged to a skilled nursing facility/long term acute care/rehabilitation center (p=.000), patients discharged to home with home health (p=.013), and patients who required inpatient physical therapy (p=.000). The following demographic variables were found to be related to postoperative delirium after cardiac surgery: age, cardiopulmonary bypass time, number of pre existing medical conditions; past medical history of: arrhythmias, CHF, and renal disease; type of surgery: CABG and CABG with valve surgery; and medications given after surgery: PO Benzodiazepines, IV Ketorolac, and Ambien. <p><b>Conclusion: </b>Patients who develop postoperative delirium are more likely to experience poorer outcomes. They are more likely to fall, stay longer after surgery, be discharged to a nursing facility, be discharged to home with home health, and require inpatient physical therapy.en_GB
dc.subjectCardiac surgeryen_GB
dc.subjectFallsen_GB
dc.subjectPostoperative deliriumen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:28:10Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:28:10Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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