2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304056
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Empowering Teaching Strategies Used by Baccalaureate Nursing Faculty
Author(s):
Brancato, Vera C.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Eta
Author Details:
Vera C. Brancato, EdD, RN, MSN, BSN, vera.brancato@alvernia.edu
Abstract:

Session presented on: Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Purpose:

The purpose of this study was to describe nursing faculty's use of empowering teaching behaviors among baccalaureate nursing faculty.

Methods:

Multistage cluster sampling was used to randomly select nursing programs from which nursing faculty members were invited to participate in the research study. A random national sample consisting of 531 full-time baccalaureate nursing faculty members was used to identify the number of empowering teaching behaviors utilized in NLNAC accredited generic undergraduate programs and RN to BSN programs. Demographic characteristics were obtained on the sample and their respective institutions. Empowering teaching behaviors were measured using Part II of the Status and Promotion of Professional Nursing Practice Questionnaire (SPPNPQ) (Carlson-Catalano, 1988). This tool included 40 teaching strategies divided into four subscales used to describe strategies to empower nursing students to become future empowered nurses. The instrument is subdivided into four categories: analytic nursing, change activities, collegiality, and sponsorship. Results: Of the surveys mailed, 531 (75%) were completed and returned for data analysis. For this study, the average number of empowering teaching behaviors was 19.5/40. This is comparable to Carlson-Catalano's (1988) mean of 19. The results indicate use of more collegiality and analytic teaching strategies and less frequent use of change activities. Sponsorship strategies were used the least often.

Conclusion: Although faculty reported using only approximately half of the 40 empowering teaching strategies, the 75% response rate indicated their interest in this topic. All 40 empowering teaching behaviors should be used consistently to provide the essential opportunities for nurses to participate actively in changing practice within the health care arena.

Keywords:
Nursing Education; Empowerment; Teaching Strategies
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmpowering Teaching Strategies Used by Baccalaureate Nursing Facultyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrancato, Vera C.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentEtaen_GB
dc.author.detailsVera C. Brancato, EdD, RN, MSN, BSN, vera.brancato@alvernia.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304056-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Tuesday, July 23, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b> <p>The purpose of this study was to describe nursing faculty's use of empowering teaching behaviors among baccalaureate nursing faculty. <p><b>Methods: </b> <p>Multistage cluster sampling was used to randomly select nursing programs from which nursing faculty members were invited to participate in the research study. A random national sample consisting of 531 full-time baccalaureate nursing faculty members was used to identify the number of empowering teaching behaviors utilized in NLNAC accredited generic undergraduate programs and RN to BSN programs. Demographic characteristics were obtained on the sample and their respective institutions. Empowering teaching behaviors were measured using Part II of the Status and Promotion of Professional Nursing Practice Questionnaire (SPPNPQ) (Carlson-Catalano, 1988). This tool included 40 teaching strategies divided into four subscales used to describe strategies to empower nursing students to become future empowered nurses. The instrument is subdivided into four categories: analytic nursing, change activities, collegiality, and sponsorship. <b>Results: </b> Of the surveys mailed, 531 (75%) were completed and returned for data analysis. For this study, the average number of empowering teaching behaviors was 19.5/40. This is comparable to Carlson-Catalano's (1988) mean of 19. The results indicate use of more collegiality and analytic teaching strategies and less frequent use of change activities. Sponsorship strategies were used the least often. <p><b>Conclusion: </b> Although faculty reported using only approximately half of the 40 empowering teaching strategies, the 75% response rate indicated their interest in this topic. All 40 empowering teaching behaviors should be used consistently to provide the essential opportunities for nurses to participate actively in changing practice within the health care arena.en_GB
dc.subjectNursing Educationen_GB
dc.subjectEmpowermenten_GB
dc.subjectTeaching Strategiesen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:28:22Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:28:22Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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