Evaluating Nursing Students' Self-Efficacy in Writing Competency: Effects of a Structured Writing Intervention

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304071
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluating Nursing Students' Self-Efficacy in Writing Competency: Effects of a Structured Writing Intervention
Author(s):
Miller, Louise C.; Lannin, Amy A.; Russell, Cynthia; Selting, Bonita; Moore, Elizabeth
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Louise C. Miller, PhD, RN, LMiller@missouri.edu; Amy A. Lannin, PhD; Cynthia Russell, PhD, RN; Bonita Selting, PhD; Elizabeth Moore, BSN;
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013, Thursday, July 25, 2013

Purpose: Strong nursing leadership is critical to optimal health care delivery. Nurses’ ability to effectively lead is in part dependent upon skilled communication, both written and oral. Yet formal preparation in writing is often assumed in undergraduate nursing education rather than explicitly taught. Evidence from composition studies and numerous disciplines, including nursing, indicates there is a strong link between students' reflective writing regarding work experiences and their critical thinking and problem solving skills. An important factor in achieving writing competence can be explained by having confidence that one can be a successful writer, as shown in studies using Bandura's Concept of Self-Efficacy to predict writing success. The purpose of this study is to test a structured writing intervention to determine its impact on writing self-efficacy in non-traditional undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students (RN-BSN).

Methods: Using a pre-post design, this study assesses writing self-efficacy in RN-BSN completion students during a 16-week Evidence-based Nursing Practice capstone course. The Post-Secondary Writerly Self-Efficacy Scale, scored on a continuum from 0% to 100%, is administered to student volunteers at the beginning and end of the course. Nursing and Composition faculty deliver the writing intervention using the 6+1 Trait Analytical Model© to guide students in a graduated sequence of writing experiences to promote development, reinforcement, and assimilation of skills. Three traits (ideas, organization, voice) are the first areas of focus, and later, inclusion of all traits (word choice, sentence fluency, conventions, presentation added) complete the intervention.  

Results: Change scores are analyzed using appropriate inferential statistics. Final results are available at semester end.   

Conclusion: Writing confidence in students can be improved when attention is given to writing assignments, sequencing, and evaluation.  This particular writing intervention is easily adapted to other nursing and inter-professional educational venues to foster writing skill development, an essential skill for professional leaders and scholars.

Keywords:
Writing skill-building; Self-efficacy; Undergraduate nursing education
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluating Nursing Students' Self-Efficacy in Writing Competency: Effects of a Structured Writing Interventionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Louise C.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorLannin, Amy A.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorRussell, Cynthiaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSelting, Bonitaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Elizabethen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsLouise C. Miller, PhD, RN, LMiller@missouri.edu; Amy A. Lannin, PhD; Cynthia Russell, PhD, RN; Bonita Selting, PhD; Elizabeth Moore, BSN;en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304071-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013, Thursday, July 25, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b>Strong nursing leadership is critical to optimal health care delivery. Nurses’ ability to effectively lead is in part dependent upon skilled communication, both written and oral. Yet formal preparation in writing is often assumed in undergraduate nursing education rather than explicitly taught. Evidence from composition studies and numerous disciplines, including nursing, indicates there is a strong link between students' reflective writing regarding work experiences and their critical thinking and problem solving skills. An important factor in achieving writing competence can be explained by having confidence that one can be a successful writer, as shown in studies using Bandura's Concept of Self-Efficacy to predict writing success. The purpose of this study is to test a structured writing intervention to determine its impact on writing self-efficacy in non-traditional undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students (RN-BSN). <p><b>Methods: </b>Using a pre-post design, this study assesses writing self-efficacy in RN-BSN completion students during a 16-week Evidence-based Nursing Practice capstone course. The Post-Secondary Writerly Self-Efficacy Scale, scored on a continuum from 0% to 100%, is administered to student volunteers at the beginning and end of the course. Nursing and Composition faculty deliver the writing intervention using the 6+1 Trait Analytical Model<sup>©</sup> to guide students in a graduated sequence of writing experiences to promote development, reinforcement, and assimilation of skills. Three traits (ideas, organization, voice) are the first areas of focus, and later, inclusion of all traits (word choice, sentence fluency, conventions, presentation added) complete the intervention.   <p><b>Results: </b>Change scores are analyzed using appropriate inferential statistics. Final results are available at semester end.    <p><b>Conclusion: </b>Writing confidence in students can be improved when attention is given to writing assignments, sequencing, and evaluation.  This particular writing intervention is easily adapted to other nursing and inter-professional educational venues to foster writing skill development, an essential skill for professional leaders and scholars.en_GB
dc.subjectWriting skill-buildingen_GB
dc.subjectSelf-efficacyen_GB
dc.subjectUndergraduate nursing educationen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:28:39Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:28:39Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.