Through Different Eyes: Patients' and Nurses' Perceptions of the Environment in an Australian Hospital

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304074
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Through Different Eyes: Patients' and Nurses' Perceptions of the Environment in an Australian Hospital
Author(s):
Williams, Ann Katherine; Armitage, Deborah Mary
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Ann Katherine Williams, RN, BA (Hons), MEd, PhD, ann.williams@hnehealth.nsw.gov.au; Deborah Mary Armitage, RN, MN;
Abstract:

Session presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Purpose:

Evidence suggests that hospital environments impact on patient outcomes with environments  perceived by patients as patient friendly having a therapeutic effect. This study explored patients’ and nurses’ perceptions of the physical environment in order to inform person-centred education.

Methods:

A three stage modified photovoice methodology using opportunistic, non-purposive sampling of an in-patient population. Stage one: Patients were recruited and invited to nominate aspects of the physical environment which had particular meaning to them. Photographs of the nominated aspects were taken and participants were later interviewed and asked to describe the meaning the image/s had for them. Stage two: Nurses were recruited and not informed of the origin of the images. They were invited to select any number of photographs and describe what the image/s meant to them. Stage three: Nurses were recruited and informed that the images were chosen by patients. They were then invited to describe what the image/s meant to them.

Results:

Data analysis included: A thematic analysis of perceptions of: every image chosen by a patient or nurse and images chosen by both patients and nurses to conduct a cross-comparative thematic analysis of perceptions. Results showed that patients’ and nurses’ perceptions of the hospital environment differed. While patients ascribed personal meaning to the images, nurses predominantly ascribed clinical meaning. 

Conclusion:

The ability to identify personal meaning embedded in a clinical context did not occur naturally for nurses in this study. It would appear that being ‘person-centred’ as well as ‘clinically focussed’ is learnt rather than intuitive. Informing nurses that the images were chosen by patients however, forced them to make a clinical-person-centred perceptual shift. The challenge for nursing education is to instil in undergraduate nurses a natural ability to see both the personal and clinical dimension of the care environment.

Keywords:
perception; cognitive shift; person-centredness
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThrough Different Eyes: Patients' and Nurses' Perceptions of the Environment in an Australian Hospitalen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Ann Katherineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorArmitage, Deborah Maryen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsAnn Katherine Williams, RN, BA (Hons), MEd, PhD, ann.williams@hnehealth.nsw.gov.au; Deborah Mary Armitage, RN, MN;en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304074-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b> <p>Evidence suggests that hospital environments impact on patient outcomes with environments  perceived by patients as patient friendly having a therapeutic effect. This study explored patients’ and nurses’ perceptions of the physical environment in order to inform person-centred education. <p><b>Methods: </b> <p>A three stage modified photovoice methodology using opportunistic, non-purposive sampling of an in-patient population. Stage one: Patients were recruited and invited to nominate aspects of the physical environment which had particular meaning to them. Photographs of the nominated aspects were taken and participants were later interviewed and asked to describe the meaning the image/s had for them. Stage two: Nurses were recruited and not informed of the origin of the images. They were invited to select any number of photographs and describe what the image/s meant to them. Stage three: Nurses were recruited and informed that the images were chosen by patients. They were then invited to describe what the image/s meant to them. <p><b>Results: </b> <p>Data analysis included: A thematic analysis of perceptions of: every image chosen by a patient or nurse and images chosen by both patients and nurses to conduct a cross-comparative thematic analysis of perceptions. Results showed that patients’ and nurses’ perceptions of the hospital environment differed. While patients ascribed personal meaning to the images, nurses predominantly ascribed clinical meaning.  <p><b>Conclusion: </b> <p>The ability to identify personal meaning embedded in a clinical context did not occur naturally for nurses in this study. It would appear that being ‘person-centred’ as well as ‘clinically focussed’ is learnt rather than intuitive. Informing nurses that the images were chosen by patients however, forced them to make a clinical-person-centred perceptual shift. The challenge for nursing education is to instil in undergraduate nurses a natural ability to see both the personal and clinical dimension of the care environment.en_GB
dc.subjectperceptionen_GB
dc.subjectcognitive shiften_GB
dc.subjectperson-centrednessen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:28:43Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:28:43Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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