2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304084
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pain, Coping and Sleep in Children and Adolescents with Sickle Cell Disease
Author(s):
Graves, Joyce Kelly; Jacob, Eufemia
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Tau
Author Details:
Joyce Kelly Graves, PhD, DNSc, RN, kgraves@sonnet.ucla.edu; Eufemia Jacob, PhD, RN;
Abstract:

Session presented on: Monday, July 22, 2013

Purpose:

The purpose of this study was to examine pain, pain coping and sleep and to examine the relationship among pain, pain coping and sleep in children and adolescents with sickle cell disease.' Factors (age, gender and number of pain episodes) that predict pain, pain coping and sleep in children also were examined in this population.

Methods:

Children (n=39; mean 11.9 ' 1.1 years) and adolescents (n=27; mean 15.5 ' 0.9 years) with sickle cell disease completed an electronic visual analog scale (eVAS), 'Adolescent Pediatric Pain Tool, Pain Coping Questionnaire, and Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index prior to participating in a wireless intervention program.

Results:

Overall pain the past month showed that 23 (34.8%) participants had no pain, 27 (40.9%) had mild (mean 1.8 ' 1.1 on 0 to 10 eVAS); 10 (15.1%) had moderate (mean 5.3 ' 1.0) and 6 (9.0%) had severe (8.1 ' 0.6) pain.' The coping strategies used were positive approaches (2.76 ' 0.76), problem focused (2.71 ' 0.81), emotion focused (1.73 ' 0.63), and distraction (2.71 ' 0.92).' The majority had mild (n=44; 67%) or moderate (n=18; 27%) sleep disturbance; few were severe (n=4; 0.6%).' The most common sleep disturbances, which occurred once or twice a week, were waking up in the middle of the night or early morning (n=19; 26.8%), feeling too cold (n=15; 21.1%), feeling too hot (n=14; 19.7%), and using the bathroom (n=14; 19.7%). ''Age, gender and number of pain episodes did not have significant effects on pain, pain coping and sleep.

Conclusion:

The majority of the children with sickle cell disease experienced mild to moderate pain and mild to moderate disturbed sleep.' Identifying pain coping strategies of children with SCD can inform health care managers regarding interventions to facilitate uninterruped sleep and improve children's daytime quality of life.

Keywords:
pain in children; sleep; coping
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013 ; 22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titlePain, Coping and Sleep in Children and Adolescents with Sickle Cell Diseaseen
dc.contributor.authorGraves, Joyce Kellyen
dc.contributor.authorJacob, Eufemiaen
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Tauen
dc.author.detailsJoyce Kelly Graves, PhD, DNSc, RN, kgraves@sonnet.ucla.edu; Eufemia Jacob, PhD, RN;en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304084-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Monday, July 22, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b> <p>The purpose of this study was to examine pain, pain coping and sleep and to examine the relationship among pain, pain coping and sleep in children and adolescents with sickle cell disease.' Factors (age, gender and number of pain episodes) that predict pain, pain coping and sleep in children also were examined in this population. <p><b>Methods: </b> <p>Children (n=39; mean 11.9 ' 1.1 years) and adolescents (n=27; mean 15.5 ' 0.9 years) with sickle cell disease completed an electronic visual analog scale (eVAS), 'Adolescent Pediatric Pain Tool, Pain Coping Questionnaire, and Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index prior to participating in a wireless intervention program. <p><b>Results: </b> <p>Overall pain the past month showed that 23 (34.8%) participants had no pain, 27 (40.9%) had mild (mean 1.8 ' 1.1 on 0 to 10 eVAS); 10 (15.1%) had moderate (mean 5.3 ' 1.0) and 6 (9.0%) had severe (8.1 ' 0.6) pain.' The coping strategies used were positive approaches (2.76 ' 0.76), problem focused (2.71 ' 0.81), emotion focused (1.73 ' 0.63), and distraction (2.71 ' 0.92).' The majority had mild (n=44; 67%) or moderate (n=18; 27%) sleep disturbance; few were severe (n=4; 0.6%).' The most common sleep disturbances, which occurred once or twice a week, were waking up in the middle of the night or early morning (n=19; 26.8%), feeling too cold (n=15; 21.1%), feeling too hot (n=14; 19.7%), and using the bathroom (n=14; 19.7%). ''Age, gender and number of pain episodes did not have significant effects on pain, pain coping and sleep. <p><b>Conclusion: </b> <p>The majority of the children with sickle cell disease experienced mild to moderate pain and mild to moderate disturbed sleep.' Identifying pain coping strategies of children with SCD can inform health care managers regarding interventions to facilitate uninterruped sleep and improve children's daytime quality of life.en
dc.subjectpain in childrenen
dc.subjectsleepen
dc.subjectcopingen
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:28:52Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22en
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:28:52Z-
dc.conference.date2013en
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en
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