Gender Differences in Type 2 Diabetes Self-Management Among Spanish-Speaking, Mexican Immigrants

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304090
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Gender Differences in Type 2 Diabetes Self-Management Among Spanish-Speaking, Mexican Immigrants
Author(s):
Smith-Miller, Cheryl A.; Berry, Diane C.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Chi
Author Details:
Cheryl A. Smith-Miller, PhD, RN-BC, csmith@unch.unc.edu; Diane C. Berry, PhD, CANP;
Abstract:

Session presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Persons of Mexican heritage had the highest age-adjusted increase in diagnosed diabetes from 1997 to 2007 of any Latino subgroup. However, the lack of knowledge about the T2DM self-management practices of recent Mexican immigrants impedes the provision of culturally appropriate health care and interventions to effectively address their unique needs in the United States.

Purpose: The purpose of the study was twofold; one, to describe Spanish-speaking, Mexican immigrants’ type 2 diabetes (T2DM) self-management using social cognitive theory as a framework; and, two, to examine the influence of health literacy, diabetes knowledge, self-efficacy on diet practices and physical activity.

Methods: Mixed-methods were used to achieve the study aims.

Results: Gender, culture, and social environment informed and influenced nutritional practices and exercise behaviors among the 19 female and 11 male (N = 30) Spanish-speaking Latino participants. These differences were manifest in glycemic control and weight, and reported in physical activity and family support. Although its affect was uncertain, literacy indirectly influenced type 2 diabetes self-management and women reported lower academic achievement levels than men. Women were more likely to attribute being depressed because of their diabetes than men were, but men were more likely to report difficulty with excessive alcohol consumption. Improved T2DM self-management was associated with increased self-efficacy related to diabetes, especially among the women. Finally, women had lower level of eating and exercise self-efficacy and less physical activity compared to men.

Conclusion: Spanish-speaking, Mexican immigrant women and men face unique T2DM self-management challenges related to language and culture. This study revealed that gender is also a factor in T2DM. Gender sensitive interventions can improve self-management outcomes and enhance self-efficacy. A nursing delivered, patient-centered, multi-faceted approach to patient education and support could improve individual’s understanding about T2DM self-management and mitigate the challenges associated with low literacy and inadequate diabetes knowledge.

Keywords:
Mexican immigrants; gender differences; type 2 diabetes
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGender Differences in Type 2 Diabetes Self-Management Among Spanish-Speaking, Mexican Immigrantsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSmith-Miller, Cheryl A.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBerry, Diane C.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Chien_GB
dc.author.detailsCheryl A. Smith-Miller, PhD, RN-BC, csmith@unch.unc.edu; Diane C. Berry, PhD, CANP;en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304090-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013</p>Persons of Mexican heritage had the highest age-adjusted increase in diagnosed diabetes from 1997 to 2007 of any Latino subgroup.<sup> </sup>However, the lack of knowledge about the T2DM self-management practices of recent Mexican immigrants impedes the provision of culturally appropriate health care and interventions to effectively address their unique needs in the United States. <p><b><b>Purpose: </b> </b>The purpose of the study was twofold; one, to describe Spanish-speaking, Mexican immigrants’ type 2 diabetes (T2DM) self-management using social cognitive theory as a framework; and, two, to examine the influence of health literacy, diabetes knowledge, self-efficacy on diet practices and physical activity. <p><b><b>Methods: </b></b> Mixed-methods were used to achieve the study aims. <p><b><b>Results: </b></b> Gender, culture, and social environment informed and influenced nutritional practices and exercise behaviors among the 19 female and 11 male (<i>N</i> = 30) Spanish-speaking Latino participants. These differences were manifest in glycemic control and weight, and reported in physical activity and family support. Although its affect was uncertain, literacy indirectly influenced type 2 diabetes self-management and women reported lower academic achievement levels than men. Women were more likely to attribute being depressed because of their diabetes than men were, but men were more likely to report difficulty with excessive alcohol consumption. Improved T2DM self-management was associated with increased self-efficacy related to diabetes, especially among the women. Finally, women had lower level of eating and exercise self-efficacy and less physical activity compared to men. <p><b><b>Conclusion: </b></b> Spanish-speaking, Mexican immigrant women and men face unique T2DM self-management challenges related to language and culture. This study revealed that gender is also a factor in T2DM. Gender sensitive interventions can improve self-management outcomes and enhance self-efficacy. A nursing delivered, patient-centered, multi-faceted approach to patient education and support could improve individual’s understanding about T2DM self-management and mitigate the challenges associated with low literacy and inadequate diabetes knowledge.en_GB
dc.subjectMexican immigrantsen_GB
dc.subjectgender differencesen_GB
dc.subjecttype 2 diabetesen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:28:57Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:28:57Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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