Supporting People with Co-Existing Chronic Conditions to Take Prescribed Medicines Through Motivational Interviewing

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304098
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Supporting People with Co-Existing Chronic Conditions to Take Prescribed Medicines Through Motivational Interviewing
Author(s):
Williams, Allison Fiona; Manias, Elizabeth
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Epsilon Theta
Author Details:
Allison Fiona Williams, PhD, RN, allison.williams@monash.edu; Elizabeth Manias, RN, MPharm, PhD;
Abstract:

Session presented on: Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Purpose:

 An exploration of  people’s motivation and confidence to take their medicines as prescribed in the presence of co-existing chronic conditions (diabetes, chronic kidney disease and hypertension).

Methods:

 Motivational interviewing telephone calls were conducted with participants aged ≥ 18 years of age with diabetes, chronic kidney disease and hypertension who were recruited from outpatients’ clinics of an Australian metropolitan hospital. Around four motivational interviewing telephone calls were made with each participant (n=39) over 12 weeks in the intervention arm of a randomised controlled trial. The data was analysed according to an atheoretical framework of qualitative data analysis.

Results:

The 39 participants were aged 68 years (mean), were mostly male, were prescribed 7.6 (mean) medicines daily (excluding insulin and over the counter preparations), and reported 7.7 (mean) other chronic conditions. Four core themes emerged, which were discontent with the medical model of care, actively managing health, trying to manage health, and overwhelming complex health problems. Subthemes were identified from the four core themes. Participants wanted to take control of their health, and developed various coping strategies to manage their lives on a daily basis. The participants’ motivation and confidence in taking their medicines was set back by their complex medicine regimens and medical conditions. Participants were overwhelmed even though they valued the medicines that kept them alive. Unstable health readings and symptomless diseases, irrespective of their seriousness, provided minimal incentives to take medicines as prescribed.

Conclusion:

Taking multiple prescribed medicines is a daily reminder of vulnerable health states with major psychological consequences affecting medicine adherence. People with long-term medical conditions require simplification of their medicine regimens and ongoing emotional and social support to help them to manage their health long-term.

Keywords:
medicine adherence; motivational interviewing; co-existing chronic conditions
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSupporting People with Co-Existing Chronic Conditions to Take Prescribed Medicines Through Motivational Interviewingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Allison Fionaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorManias, Elizabethen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentEpsilon Thetaen_GB
dc.author.detailsAllison Fiona Williams, PhD, RN, allison.williams@monash.edu; Elizabeth Manias, RN, MPharm, PhD;en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304098-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Tuesday, July 23, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b> <p> An exploration of  people’s motivation and confidence to take their medicines as prescribed in the presence of co-existing chronic conditions (diabetes, chronic kidney disease and hypertension). <p><b>Methods: </b> <p> Motivational interviewing telephone calls were conducted with participants aged ≥ 18 years of age with diabetes, chronic kidney disease and hypertension who were recruited from outpatients’ clinics of an Australian metropolitan hospital. Around four motivational interviewing telephone calls were made with each participant (n=39) over 12 weeks in the intervention arm of a randomised controlled trial. The data was analysed according to an atheoretical framework of qualitative data analysis. <p><b>Results: </b> <p>The 39 participants were aged 68 years (mean), were mostly male, were prescribed 7.6 (mean) medicines daily (excluding insulin and over the counter preparations), and reported 7.7 (mean) other chronic conditions. Four core themes emerged, which were discontent with the medical model of care, actively managing health, trying to manage health, and overwhelming complex health problems. Subthemes were identified from the four core themes. Participants wanted to take control of their health, and developed various coping strategies to manage their lives on a daily basis. The participants’ motivation and confidence in taking their medicines was set back by their complex medicine regimens and medical conditions. Participants were overwhelmed even though they valued the medicines that kept them alive. Unstable health readings and symptomless diseases, irrespective of their seriousness, provided minimal incentives to take medicines as prescribed. <p><b>Conclusion: </b> <p>Taking multiple prescribed medicines is a daily reminder of vulnerable health states with major psychological consequences affecting medicine adherence. People with long-term medical conditions require simplification of their medicine regimens and ongoing emotional and social support to help them to manage their health long-term.en_GB
dc.subjectmedicine adherenceen_GB
dc.subjectmotivational interviewingen_GB
dc.subjectco-existing chronic conditionsen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:29:05Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:29:05Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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