Engaging Frontline Staff to Create Interdisciplinary Solutions: A Formative Step toward Shared Governance

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304101
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Engaging Frontline Staff to Create Interdisciplinary Solutions: A Formative Step toward Shared Governance
Author(s):
Buckner, Ellen B.; Roussel, Linda Ann; Dearmon, Valorie A.; Mestas, Lisa
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Zeta Gamma
Author Details:
Ellen B. Buckner, DSN, RN, CNE, ebuckner@usouthal.edu; Linda Ann Roussel, RN, DSN, NEA, BC; Valorie A. Dearmon, RN, DNP NEA-BC; Lisa Mestas, RN, MSN;
Abstract:

Session presented on: Monday, July 22, 2013

Understanding the complexities of hospital work environments is a crucial first step to transforming the delivery of nursing care (IOM, 2004).   Frontline workers’ wisdom and their commitment to solutions are essential for improvement (IOM, 2010; Porter O’Grady & Malloch, 2010).  Improvement Science is an emerging science that shares common aspects with other areas of research such as implementation science, translational science, and knowledge translation. The focus of Improvement Science is on translating what is learned from research into actual practice to improve care and outcomes (ISRN, 2011). This quality initiative has global implications for addressing common problems in nursing practice.

University of South Alabama Medical Center and University of South Alabama College of Nursing participated as a first cohort in a national study “Small Troubles, Adaptive Responses (STAR-2):  Frontline Nurse Engagement in Quality Improvement (Stevens & Ferrer, 2011).  Frontline nurses identified operational failures, team vitality and measures of culture of safety.  The data collected reflected significant potential for improvement interventions from multiple disciplines (technology, pharmacy, nursing, medicine, etc.). 

Following the national study, a Frontline Innovations group was formed to identify solutions to address common interruptions of nurses’ work, test these innovations, and determine effects on quality of care.  The formation of interdisciplinary teams promoted understanding of the problems, improved communication and interdepartmental relationships. 

Early results indicate renewed staff enthusiasm, empowerment, and ownership of their practice environment secondary to having a voice. This stage is foundational for shared governance (Kear, Duncan, Fansler, & Hunt, 2012; Newman, 2011).  Meaningful change occurred as problems were solved and new relationships formed. Opportunities for transforming the culture to one of shared decision-making are evident. Participation enabled our team to become active contributors to the priority research studies of the ISRN and initiate a structure for sustained shared governance.

Keywords:
improvement science; interdisciplinary solutions; frontline engagement
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEngaging Frontline Staff to Create Interdisciplinary Solutions: A Formative Step toward Shared Governanceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBuckner, Ellen B.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorRoussel, Linda Annen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDearmon, Valorie A.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorMestas, Lisaen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentZeta Gammaen_GB
dc.author.detailsEllen B. Buckner, DSN, RN, CNE, ebuckner@usouthal.edu; Linda Ann Roussel, RN, DSN, NEA, BC; Valorie A. Dearmon, RN, DNP NEA-BC; Lisa Mestas, RN, MSN;en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304101-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Monday, July 22, 2013</p>Understanding the complexities of hospital work environments is a crucial first step to transforming the delivery of nursing care (IOM, 2004).   Frontline workers’ wisdom and their commitment to solutions are essential for improvement (IOM, 2010; Porter O’Grady & Malloch, 2010).  Improvement Science is an emerging science that shares common aspects with other areas of research such as implementation science, translational science, and knowledge translation. The focus of Improvement Science is on translating what is learned from research into actual practice to improve care and outcomes (ISRN, 2011). This quality initiative has global implications for addressing common problems in nursing practice. <p>University of South Alabama Medical Center and University of South Alabama College of Nursing participated as a first cohort in a national study “Small Troubles, Adaptive Responses (STAR-2):  Frontline Nurse Engagement in Quality Improvement (Stevens & Ferrer, 2011).  Frontline nurses identified operational failures, team vitality and measures of culture of safety.  The data collected reflected significant potential for improvement interventions from multiple disciplines (technology, pharmacy, nursing, medicine, etc.).  <p>Following the national study, a Frontline Innovations group was formed to identify solutions to address common interruptions of nurses’ work, test these innovations, and determine effects on quality of care.  The formation of interdisciplinary teams promoted understanding of the problems, improved communication and interdepartmental relationships.  <p>Early results indicate renewed staff enthusiasm, empowerment, and ownership of their practice environment secondary to having a voice. This stage is foundational for shared governance (Kear, Duncan, Fansler, & Hunt, 2012; Newman, 2011).  Meaningful change occurred as problems were solved and new relationships formed. Opportunities for transforming the culture to one of shared decision-making are evident. Participation enabled our team to become active contributors to the priority research studies of the ISRN and initiate a structure for sustained shared governance.en_GB
dc.subjectimprovement scienceen_GB
dc.subjectinterdisciplinary solutionsen_GB
dc.subjectfrontline engagementen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:29:08Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:29:08Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
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