What Do Fathers Contribute? Fathers in Situational Crisis: A Comparison of Asian and Western Cultures

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304153
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
What Do Fathers Contribute? Fathers in Situational Crisis: A Comparison of Asian and Western Cultures
Author(s):
Tseng, Yun Shan
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Yun Shan Tseng, PhD, ytsen01@isu.edu.tw
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Thursday, July 25, 2013, Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Purpose: Current studies of situational crisis are mostly based on western perceptions. Likewise, a few studies have explored fathers’ anxiety when they are under certain situational crises. No studies comparing the difference of fathers in a situational crisis between eastern and western cultures could be located. The purpose of the synthesis was to discuss Asian and western father’s perception of the fathers’ role within different situational crises related to their children, including critically ill children, chronically ill children, and children with mental/developmental disease. 

Methods: The literature search was conducted by using search engines, including PsycINFO, CINAHL, Taiwan Electronic Thesis and Dissertation System, Google, Google Scholar, Medline (OVID), and PubMed. Twenty-two 22 studies were reviewed and assigned to one of two categories, the father experiencing a situational crisis related to his child’s illness, or cultural influences on the paternal role.

Results: Paternal participation and role are affected by the social and cultural environment, social resources and family members. Fathers who have sick children tend to have negative emotional reactions, such as anxiety, fear, and anger. Nevertheless, Asian fathers are more patriarchal than western fathers. The literature review indicates that Asian and western fathers’ concepts and perceptions of crisis do not differ greatly.

It was concluded that there exists a gap in the literature with respect to knowledge of Asian fathers’ situational crisis surrounding their child’s illness, their coping strategies when faced with their child’s illness, as well as their emotional reactions toward family health. The reviewed studies were limited to English or Mandarin speaking families and Asian/western parents.

Conclusion: Further research should consider cultural factors, gender difference and pay more attention to father’s perceptions and emotional reactions, which may include single or same-gender fathers. Families in a situational crisis would benefit from the healthcare professionals acquiring enhanced knowledge and sensitivity about cultural diversity.

Keywords:
Culture; Situational crisis; Father
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhat Do Fathers Contribute? Fathers in Situational Crisis: A Comparison of Asian and Western Culturesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTseng, Yun Shanen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsYun Shan Tseng, PhD, ytsen01@isu.edu.twen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304153-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Thursday, July 25, 2013, Wednesday, July 24, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b> Current studies of situational crisis are mostly based on western perceptions. Likewise, a few studies have explored fathers’ anxiety when they are under certain situational crises. No studies comparing the difference of fathers in a situational crisis between eastern and western cultures could be located. The purpose of the synthesis was to discuss Asian and western father’s perception of the fathers’ role within different situational crises related to their children, including critically ill children, chronically ill children, and children with mental/developmental disease.  <p><b>Methods: </b>The literature search was conducted by using search engines, including PsycINFO, CINAHL, Taiwan Electronic Thesis and Dissertation System, Google, Google Scholar, Medline (OVID), and PubMed. Twenty-two 22 studies were reviewed and assigned to one of two categories, the father experiencing a situational crisis related to his child’s illness, or cultural influences on the paternal role. <p><b>Results: </b>Paternal participation and role are affected by the social and cultural environment, social resources and family members. Fathers who have sick children tend to have negative emotional reactions, such as anxiety, fear, and anger. Nevertheless, Asian fathers are more patriarchal than western fathers. The literature review indicates that Asian and western fathers’ concepts and perceptions of crisis do not differ greatly. <p>It was concluded that there exists a gap in the literature with respect to knowledge of Asian fathers’ situational crisis surrounding their child’s illness, their coping strategies when faced with their child’s illness, as well as their emotional reactions toward family health. The reviewed studies were limited to English or Mandarin speaking families and Asian/western parents. <p><b>Conclusion: </b> Further research should consider cultural factors, gender difference and pay more attention to father’s perceptions and emotional reactions, which may include single or same-gender fathers. Families in a situational crisis would benefit from the healthcare professionals acquiring enhanced knowledge and sensitivity about cultural diversity.en_GB
dc.subjectCultureen_GB
dc.subjectSituational crisisen_GB
dc.subjectFatheren_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:30:04Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:30:04Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.