Birth Outcomes: Is There a Difference in Women Who Live in Rural Versus Urban New Hampshire USA?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304197
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Birth Outcomes: Is There a Difference in Women Who Live in Rural Versus Urban New Hampshire USA?
Author(s):
Hamlin, Lynette A.; Hindman, Margaret E.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Lynette A. Hamlin, PhD, RN, CNM, FACNM, lhamlin3@att.net; Margaret E. Hindman, PhD, APRN, FNP-BC;
Abstract:

Session presented on: Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Purpose:

 In 2009 hospitals in the North Country New Hampshire began closing their doors to obstetrical services due to rising health care costs. The North County encompasses over 1200 square miles. The southern portion of the state of New Hampshire is an urban area and provides more access to care. The purpose of this research is to examine whether or not there are differences in prenatal and birth outcomes between women who live in the North Country and urban New Hampshire.

Methods:  

The research analysis is with secondary data. Birth data from 2005 to 2012, obtained from the New Hampshire Division of Public Health Services Bureau of Health Statistics and Data Management was used for analysis with SPSS statistical software.

Results:  

Comparing prenatal and birth outcomes between rural and urban New Hampshire, there were statistically significant differences in Apgar scores, maternal diabetes, maternal hypertension, NICU admission, surfactant use, and method of birth. In comparing demographic factors, there is a difference in place of birth, birth attendant, maternal and paternal educational levels, race, maternal smoking, and payer source. There was no significant difference in very low or low birth weight, use of forceps or vacuum extraction, or prior cesarean section.

Conclusion:  

The potential implications of this study are at the community health and state policy levels. Nurses who provide prenatal care support, who work in hospital settings, or are advanced practice nurses need to be cognizant of the demography of rural women and the issues rural women face in securing quality prenatal care.

Keywords:
access; birth outcomes; rural health
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBirth Outcomes: Is There a Difference in Women Who Live in Rural Versus Urban New Hampshire USA?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorHamlin, Lynette A.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorHindman, Margaret E.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsLynette A. Hamlin, PhD, RN, CNM, FACNM, lhamlin3@att.net; Margaret E. Hindman, PhD, APRN, FNP-BC;en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304197-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Tuesday, July 23, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b> <p> In 2009 hospitals in the North Country New Hampshire began closing their doors to obstetrical services due to rising health care costs. The North County encompasses over 1200 square miles. The southern portion of the state of New Hampshire is an urban area and provides more access to care. The purpose of this research is to examine whether or not there are differences in prenatal and birth outcomes between women who live in the North Country and urban New Hampshire. <p><b>Methods: </b>  <p>The research analysis is with secondary data. Birth data from 2005 to 2012, obtained from the New Hampshire Division of Public Health Services Bureau of Health Statistics and Data Management was used for analysis with SPSS statistical software. <p><b>Results: </b>  <p>Comparing prenatal and birth outcomes between rural and urban New Hampshire, there were statistically significant differences in Apgar scores, maternal diabetes, maternal hypertension, NICU admission, surfactant use, and method of birth. In comparing demographic factors, there is a difference in place of birth, birth attendant, maternal and paternal educational levels, race, maternal smoking, and payer source. There was no significant difference in very low or low birth weight, use of forceps or vacuum extraction, or prior cesarean section. <p><b>Conclusion: </b>  <p>The potential implications of this study are at the community health and state policy levels. Nurses who provide prenatal care support, who work in hospital settings, or are advanced practice nurses need to be cognizant of the demography of rural women and the issues rural women face in securing quality prenatal care.en_GB
dc.subjectaccessen_GB
dc.subjectbirth outcomesen_GB
dc.subjectrural healthen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:31:00Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:31:00Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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